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I have an API which internally has some exceptions for error reporting. The basic structure is that it has a root exception object which inherits from std::exception, then it will throw some subclass of that.

Since catching an exception thrown in one library or thread and catching it in another can lead to undefined behavior (at least Qt complains about it and disallows it in many contexts). I would like to wrap the library calls in functions which will return a status code, and if an exception occurred, a copy of the exception object.

What is the best way to store an exception (with it's polymorphic behavior) for later use? I believe that the c++0x future API makes use of something like this. So what is the best approach?

The best I can think of is to have a clone() method in each exception class which will return a pointer to an exception of the same type. But that's not very generic and doesn't deal with standard exceptions at all.

Any thoughts?

EDIT: It seems that c++0x will have a mechanism for this. It is described as "library magic". Does that mean that is doesn't require any of the language features of c++0x? if not, are there any implementations which are compatible with c++03?

EDIT: Looks like boost has an implementation of exception copying. I'll keep the question open for any non boost::copy_exception answers.

EDIT: To address j_random_hacker's concerns about the root cause of the exception being an out of memory error. For this particular library and set of exceptions, this is not the case. All exceptions derived from the root exception object represent different types of parsing errors caused by invalid user input. Memory related exceptions will simply cause a std::bad_alloc to be thrown which is addressed separately.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have what would be what I think is your best, only answer. You can't keep a reference to the original exception because it's going to leave scope. You simply have to make a copy of it and the only generic way to do that is with a prototype function like clone().

Sorry.

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But beware that the root cause of the exception may be an out-of-memory condition, in which case clone() will fail if it tries to call new. This can be gotten around, e.g. by overloading operator new() for each exception type to allocate from a static buffer, but it's not necessarily pretty either. –  j_random_hacker Jun 2 '10 at 19:00
    
@j_random_hacker: Well, since we are getting pedantic, what you call out-of-memory is better called bad-alloc and it doesn't have to be actual out of memory. Another reason for bad-alloc is requesting too much memory, and in that case subsequent small allocations will succeed –  sbk Jun 2 '10 at 19:51
    
@sbk: Is it really pedantic to consider the possibility of running out of memory? –  j_random_hacker Jun 2 '10 at 20:46
    
The easy answer here is to point out that with bad_alloc you're a) screwed, and b) getting a particular exception that you're not going to be able to clone since it won't be your own. –  Crazy Eddie Jun 2 '10 at 21:15

You're allowed to throw anything, including pointers. You could always do something like this:

throw new MyException(args);

And then in the exception handler store the caught pointer, which will be fully polymorphic (below assuming that MyException derives from std::exception):

try {

   doSomething(); // Might throw MyException*

} catch (std::exception* pEx) {

   // store pEx pointer
}

You just have to be careful about memory leaks when you do it this way, which is why throw-by-value and catch-by-reference is normally used.

More about catch-by-pointer: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/exceptions.html#faq-17.8

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1  
The problem with this solution as I see it is that you might be throwing an exception due to something that has as its root cause an out-of-memory condition, in which case new will fail. –  j_random_hacker Jun 2 '10 at 18:57
1  
That's mentioned in the link, but you could in theory work around that by having a pre-allocated or static out-of-memory exception that you throw in that case. But then you would need to make sure that you don't delete this as you would your other exceptions. It's do-able but you have to be careful of a lot of pitfalls like this. –  Tyler McHenry Jun 2 '10 at 19:02
    
Couldn't we check to see if the exception indicates an out of memory condition and simply set an int/boolean to indicate this? –  Agnel Kurian Jun 2 '10 at 19:13
    
+1: For my particular use can this isn't a bad idea. similar to the clone approach but doing at the point of the throw. –  Evan Teran Jun 2 '10 at 19:31

The reason why catching an exception thrown in one library and catching it in another can lead to undefined behavior is that these libraries could be linked with different Runtime libraries. If you will return exception from a function instead of throwing it you will not avoid that problem.

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I believe you are correct, I think the issue Qt has with it is more about passing between threads (I've added that subtlety to my question as well). –  Evan Teran Jun 2 '10 at 18:54

My utility library has an AnyException class that is basically the same as boost::any without the casting support. Instead, it has a Throw() member that throws the original object stored.

struct AnyException {
  template<typename E>
  AnyException(const E& e) 
    : instance(new Exception<E>(e))
  { }

  void Throw() const {
    instance->Throw();
  }

private:
  struct ExceptionBase {
    virtual void Throw() const =0;
    virtual ~ExceptionBase() { }
  };

  template<typename E>
  struct Exception : ExceptionBase {
    Exception(const E& e)
      : instance(e)
    { }

    void Throw() const {
      throw std::move(instance);
    }

  private:
    E instance;
  };
  ExceptionBase* instance;
};

This is a simplification, but that's the basic framework. My actual code disables copying, and has move semantics instead. If needed, you can add a virtual Clone method to the ExceptionBase easily enough... since Exception knows the original type of the object, it can forward the request onto the actual copy constructor, and you immediately have support for all copiable types, not just ones with their own Clone method.

When this was designed, it was not meant for storing caught exceptions... once an exception was thrown, it propagated as normal, so out-of-memory conditions were not considered. However, I imagine you could add an instance of std::bad_alloc to the object, and store it directly in those situations.

struct AnyException {
   template<typename E>
   AnyException(const E& e) {
      try {
          instance.excep = new Exception<E>(e);
          has_exception = true;
      } catch(std::bad_alloc& bad) {
          instance.bad_alloc = bad;
          bas_exception = false;
      }
   }

   //for the case where we are given a bad_alloc to begin with... no point in even trying
   AnyException(const std::bad_alloc& bad) {
     instance.bad_alloc = bad;
     has_exception = false;
   }

   void Throw() const {
     if(has_exception)
         instance.excep->Throw();
     throw instance.bad_alloc;
   }

 private:
   union {
     ExceptionBase* excep;
     std::bad_alloc bad_alloc;
   } instance;
   bool has_exception;
 };

I haven't actually tested that second bit at all... I might be missing something glaringly obvious that will prevent it from working.

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