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is there a way to find out, where a function in PHP was called from? example:

function epic()
{
  fail();
}

function fail()
{
  //at this point, how do i know, that epic() has called this function?
}
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5 Answers 5

You can use debug_backtrace().

Example:

<?php

function epic( $a, $b )
{
    fail( $a . ' ' . $b );
}

function fail( $string )
{
    $backtrace = debug_backtrace();

    print_r( $backtrace );
}

epic( 'Hello', 'World' );

Output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [file] => /Users/romac/Desktop/test.php
            [line] => 5
            [function] => fail
            [args] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Hello World
                )

        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [file] => /Users/romac/Desktop/test.php
            [line] => 15
            [function] => epic
            [args] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Hello
                    [1] => World
                )

        )

)
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1  
First time I found debug_backtrace() what a superb function. I'll be using this one! –  DavidYell Nov 9 '12 at 10:37

Use debug_backtrace():

function fail()
{
    $backtrace = debug_backtrace();

    // Here, $backtrace[0] points to fail(), so we'll look in $backtrace[1] instead
    if (isset($backtrace[1]['function']) && $backtrace[1]['function'] == 'epic')
    {
        // Called by epic()...
    }
}
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6  
That definitely does what you want. But beware debug_backtrace() is an expensive call. Don't get in the habit of using it to determine call-chains. If you want to "protect" those functions, check out OOP and protected methods. –  ircmaxell Jun 2 '10 at 19:15
    
thanks a lot to all of you! –  pol_b Jun 2 '10 at 19:22

So if you still REALLY don't know how, than here is solution:

$backtrace = debug_backtrace();
echo 'Mu name is '.$backtrace[1]['function'].', and I have called him! Muahahah!';
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1  
So you could use if($backtrace[1]['function'] == 'epic') { // do some stuff; else do some other stuff; } ?? wow –  Buttle Butkus Aug 14 '12 at 4:30
1  
Yes, but don't! Not in permanent application code, anyway. Use parameters. debug_backtrace() looks like a pretty heavy operation. –  Kluny Apr 9 at 22:15

Use the debug_backtrace function: http://php.net/manual/en/function.debug-backtrace.php

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function findFunction($function, $inputDirectory=""){
    //version 0.1
    $docRoot = getenv("DOCUMENT_ROOT");
    $folderArray = null;
    $dirArray = null;

    // open directory
    $directory = opendir($docRoot.$inputDirectory);

    // get each entry
    while($entryName = readdir($directory)) {
        if(is_dir($entryName) && $entryName != "." && $entryName != ".."){
            $folderArray[] = str_replace($inputDirectory, "", $entryName);
        }
        $ext = explode(".", $entryName);
        if(!empty($ext[1])){
            $dirArray[] = $docRoot.$inputDirectory."/".$entryName;
        }
    }

    // close directory
    closedir($directory);
    $found = false;

    if(is_array($dirArray)){
        foreach($dirArray as $current){
            $myFile = file_get_contents($current);
            $myFile = str_replace("<?php", "", $myFile);
            $myFile = str_replace("?>", "", $myFile);
            if(preg_match("/function ".$function."/", $myFile)){
                $found = true;
                $foundLocation = $current;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    if($found){
        echo $foundLocation;
        exit;
    } else if(is_array($folderArray)){
        foreach($folderArray as $folder){
            if(!isset($return)){
                $return = findFunction($function, $inputDirectory."/".$folder);
            } else if($return == false){
                $return = findFunction($function, $inputDirectory."/".$folder);
            }
        }
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

findFunction("testFunction", "rootDirectory");

Hope it helps somebody. If the actual function is outside httpdocs then it can not be found because the server will be setup to not allow it. Only tested it one folder deep too but the recursive methodology should work in theory.

This is like version 0.1 but I don't intend on continuing development on it so if someone updates it feel free to repost it.

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Too much work: add this to .bashrc function ff() { grep "function $1" $(find ./ -name "*.php") } then call ff fail or ff epic. see: github.com/MaerF0x0/VimSetup/blob/master/bashrc#L122 –  Mike Graf May 1 '13 at 14:57

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