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I have created a factory class called AlarmFactory as such...

1    class AlarmFactory
2    {
3        public static Alarm GetAlarm(AlarmTypes alarmType)  //factory ensures that correct alarm is returned and right func pointer for trigger creator.
4        {
5            switch (alarmType)
6            {
7                case AlarmTypes.Heartbeat:
8                    HeartbeatAlarm alarm = HeartbeatAlarm.GetAlarm();
9                    alarm.CreateTriggerFunction = QuartzAlarmScheduler.CreateMinutelyTrigger;
10                    return alarm;
11
12                   break;
13                default:
14                
15                    break;
16            }
17        }
18    }

Heartbeat alarm is derived from Alarm. I am getting a compile error "cannot implicitly convert type...An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)". How do I set this up to return a derived type?

EDIT

THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR ANSWERS. I fixed the compile error within ten minutes which is why i did not post the whole error. But I appreciated the different approaches that were mentioned.

For the record it was "Cannot implicitly convert type 'goAlarmsCS.HeartbeatAlarm' to 'goAlarmsCS.Alarm' An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)". (I think.) The error was occurring on line 8.

Seth

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Please post the entire compiler error + tell us which line you get it on. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jun 2 '10 at 19:27
3  
If HeartbeatAlarm is indeed derived from Alarm, you should be able to return it without error. We may need to see more of your code and more details about the compiler error, including line, to help. –  GBegen Jun 2 '10 at 19:28
    
What does HeartbeatAlarm.GetAlarm() return: an Alarm type, or a HeartbeatAlarm type? I'm guessing this is where the compile-time error is getting triggered (downcasting from Alarm -> HeartbeatAlarm, of course) –  code4life Jun 2 '10 at 19:31
    
HeartbeatAlarm.GetAlarm returns a HeartbeatAlarm. –  Seth Spearman Jun 2 '10 at 19:55
3  
You've omitted the actual portion of the error message necessary for diagnosing the problem. Post a small, complete program that demonstrates the error. This serves two purposes. First, it lets the readers actually look at the real code that produces the problem instead of making us guess based on incomplete code and an error message that you've cleverly removed the most important information from. Second, by doing so you will probably find your bug yourself. Nothing finds a bug faster than trying to make a small repro. –  Eric Lippert Jun 2 '10 at 19:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Below is a solution that includes a specific GetHeartbeatAlarm function to retrieve a HeartbeatAlarm object as well as a generic GetAlarm function to return an alarm whose type is determined by the generic parameter. At the bottom there is some example code showing how this would be called:

enum AlarmTypes
{
    Heartbeat,
    AnotherAlarm,
    // ...
}

delegate void CreateTriggerDelegate();

class Alarm
{
    // ...

    public CreateTriggerDelegate CreateTriggerFunction { get; set; }
}

class HeartbeatAlarm : Alarm
{
    // ...

    public static HeartbeatAlarm GetAlarm()
    {
        return new HeartbeatAlarm();
    }
}

class QuartzAlarmScheduler
{
    public static CreateTriggerDelegate CreateMinutelyTrigger { get; set; }
}

class AlarmFactory
{
    public static Alarm GetAlarm(AlarmTypes alarmType)  //factory ensures that correct alarm is returned and right func pointer for trigger creator.
    {
        switch (alarmType)
        {
            case AlarmTypes.Heartbeat:
                return GetHeartbeatAlarm();
            default:
                throw new ArgumentException("Unrecognized AlarmType: " + alarmType.ToString(), "alarmType");
        }
    }

    static Alarm _GetAlarm<T>()
        where T : Alarm
    {
        Type type = typeof(T);
        if (type.Equals(typeof(HeartbeatAlarm)))
            return GetHeartbeatAlarm();
        else
            throw new ArgumentException("Unrecognized generic Alarm argument: " + type.FullName, "T");
    }

    public static T GetAlarm<T>()
        where T : Alarm
    {
        return (T)_GetAlarm<T>();
    }

    public static HeartbeatAlarm GetHeartbeatAlarm()
    {
        HeartbeatAlarm alarm = HeartbeatAlarm.GetAlarm();
        alarm.CreateTriggerFunction = QuartzAlarmScheduler.CreateMinutelyTrigger;
        return alarm;
    }
}

class Example
{
    static void GetAlarmExamples()
    {
        HeartbeatAlarm alarm;

        alarm = AlarmFactory.GetHeartbeatAlarm();

        alarm = AlarmFactory.GetAlarm<HeartbeatAlarm>();

        alarm = (HeartbeatAlarm)AlarmFactory.GetAlarm(AlarmTypes.Heartbeat);
    }
}
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Thanks for your incredibly thorough answer. Seth –  Seth Spearman Jun 2 '10 at 20:51

Your best bet would be to make Alarm an interface, or if that's not possible, create an IAlarm interface, and inherit from this interface for both Alarm and HeartbeatAlarm.

AlarmFactory.GetAlarm should return an IAlarm instance. Likewise, HeartbeatAlarm.GetAlarm() should return an IAlarm instance.

This should eliminate any compiler errors, plus the upside is that all relationships are cleanly contractual, which should make the code that much more future-friendly.

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I was under the impression that HeartbearAlarm and Alarm were Quartz types, although I've never used Quartz. –  Powerlord Jun 2 '10 at 20:00
    
They are not quartz types...although I am using quartz in this project. –  Seth Spearman Jun 2 '10 at 20:02

Have you tried what the compiler suggests?

return (Alarm) alarm;

Edit: This is completely wrong, but I'm leaving this answer here to preserve the discussion in the comments.

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That line compiles fine without the upcast. –  code4life Jun 2 '10 at 19:37
    
Sorry I am just learning c#. What if I WANT to return a derived type? Won't casting to (Alarm) return a type of Alarm rather than HeartbeatAlarm? Seth –  Seth Spearman Jun 2 '10 at 19:42
    
@Seth, Your return type is Alarm, the returned object is going to be Alarm with or without a cast. If you want to explicitly use a derived type, you will have to cast it to the derived type once you've received the object. Something like DerivedAlarm alarm = (DerivedAlarm)AlarmFactory.GetAlarm(AlarmTypes.DerivedAlarm); –  Anthony Pegram Jun 2 '10 at 19:52
    
Okay...thanks. I get it. Bottom line is you can't do it. –  Seth Spearman Jun 2 '10 at 19:56
    
@Seth: You are misunderstanding how reference conversions work. You're confusing what the compiler knows at compile time (this object is some kind of Animal) with what the object is at runtime (a Giraffe). Casting a Giraffe to Animal just tells the compiler "forget that you knew this was a Giraffe". At runtime, it's still a Giraffe. –  Eric Lippert Jun 2 '10 at 20:03

As some have already suggested, a redundant Interface is an easy way to accomplish this. Seems like a clean example might help future visitors..

public interface IAlarm
{
    public int bpm { get; set; }    // declared base props
}

public class Alarm : IAlarm
{
    public int bpm { get; set; }    // implemented base props
}

public class HeartbeatAlarm : Alarm
{
    public int min { get; set; }    // extended type specific props
}

public class FactoryMethods
{
    public static T AlarmFactory<T>(int bpm) where T : IAlarm, new()
    {
        // interfaces have no constructor but you can do this
        T alarm = new T() {
            bpm = bpm
        };

        return alarm;
    }
}

// C# will automagically infer the type now..
HeartbeatAlarm heartbeatAlarm = FactoryMethods.AlarmFactory<HeartbeatAlarm>(40);
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