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i am doing:

explain select * from calibration;

it says 52133456345632 rows

when i do:

select count(*) from calibration;

i am getting 52134563456961

can someone explain whats going on here?

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Didn't you insert new rows between the execution of these two commands? –  Leniel Macaferi Jun 2 '10 at 21:33
2  
Just to clarify: The count version will be accurate, as it will really count your existing rows. The explain version does not count your rows, but might use an estimation/cache. Explain is not intended to be actually used in code or production - it is just a tool to help analysing your queries. –  Henrik Opel Jun 2 '10 at 23:34
    
henrik please put that in an answer so that i can mark it correct –  Yuck Jun 3 '10 at 2:02
    
I added it to Bill Karwins answer directly, as his was first and correct, just not explicit enough. So you should accept his one. –  Henrik Opel Jun 3 '10 at 8:45
1  
interesting that no one commented on having 5 trillion rows in a table –  Yuck Jun 22 '10 at 22:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Table statistics (used by EXPLAIN) are based on system-cached values that may not be accurate.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/using-explain.html says:

For InnoDB tables, this number is an estimate, and may not always be exact.

So the 'count()' version of the query will be accurate, as it will really 'count' existing rows. The 'explain' version does not necessarily count your rows, but might use an estimation/cache. Explain is not intended to be actually used in code or production - it is just a tool to help analysing your queries.

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how do i reset the cache? –  Yuck Jun 2 '10 at 21:34
1  
I don't know, the manual page doesn't say. But the number is 99.8% accurate, do you really need it to be exact? –  Bill Karwin Jun 2 '10 at 21:36
1  
I added my comment to the question to your answer, as it was not intended to be an alternative but just a clarification. Hope that's OK. –  Henrik Opel Jun 3 '10 at 8:43
1  
@Henrik Opel: No problem, thanks! –  Bill Karwin Jun 3 '10 at 17:05

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