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Here is the site I'm currently working on: http://willcrichton.net/

If you click on the arrows on each side of the hexagon in the middle, you can see that it transitions left and right using jQuery + jQuery Cycle + jQuery Easing. However, you can also see that it is rather ugly -- because I'm using hexagons and not squares and because divs are square shaped, the content hexagon overlaps with with the background in an unpleasant way.

So, my question is: how would I essentially hack a div into a hexagon? That hexagon should be the same size/shape of the content div, and when content is outside the area of the hexagon it should be invisible.

Edit:

HTML

<div id="content"> 
<div class="slide">

    <a href="#"><div class="arrow left"></div></a>
    <a href="#"><div class="arrow right"></div></a>

    <div id="websites-title"></div>
    <div class="website">

    </div>
</div>
<div class="slide">
    <a href="#"><div class="arrow left"></div></a>
    <a href="#"><div class="arrow right"></div></a>

</div></div>


<script type="text/javascript">
    $("#content").cycle({
        fx: 'scrollHorz',
        timeout: 0,
        prev: ".left",
        next: ".right",
        easing: "easeInOutBack"
    });
</script>

CSS

/* Container styles */

#container {
    width: 908px;
    height: 787px;
    left: 50%;
    top: 50%;
    position: absolute;
    margin-top: -393.5px;
    margin-left: -452px;
    background-image: url("images/background.png");
    font: 12px "Lucida Sans Unicode", "Arial", sans-serif;
    z-index: 3;
}    

#content {
    width: 686px;
    height: 598px;
    position: absolute;
    left: 50%;
    top: 50%;
    margin-top: -282px;
    margin-left: -343.5px;
    /*background-image: url("images/hacky_hole2.png");*/
    z-index: 1;
}

    .slide {
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%;
        background-image: url("images/content.png");
        position: relative;
        z-index: 2;
    }

UPDATE: If you check the site now, you'd see my failed attempt at using the "window" method and you can see why the z-index did not work.

share|improve this question
    
For your hacky_hole2.png layer, your z-index needs to be higher than your slide layer. Higher numbers go higher in the z-index stack. –  Jeff Fohl Jun 2 '10 at 22:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't make a div into a hexagon, but you could use PNG files with alpha transparencies to mask the area you want. So, you would need to make four divs, each with a background that has a PNG file with the transparency that acts as a mask. These divs would be positioned absolutely over your div with the slider.

EDIT: As Pekka noted below, this could also be done with a single, large PNG file acting as a mask.

EDIT #2: Looking at the code you posted, I would revise it like this:

<div id="content"></div>
<div class="slide">

    <a href="#"><div class="arrow left"></div></a>
    <a href="#"><div class="arrow right"></div></a>

    <div id="websites-title"></div>
    <div class="website">

    </div>
</div>
<div class="slide">
    <a href="#"><div class="arrow left"></div></a>
    <a href="#"><div class="arrow right"></div></a>
</div>

Note that I closed the <div id="content"> element. This element should be a sibling of your slides, but be positioned above the slides with a higher z-index. Or, you may need to create a new element dedicated to displaying the mask, if your "content" div is used for other purposes than just displaying the mask.

share|improve this answer
    
I have tried a similar solution, but for some reason when I use z-index to position the window above the content it doesn't work. Any idea why/any alternatives? –  Will Jun 2 '10 at 22:08
    
The problem is that those PNGs would have a visible area that is the mask. You would effectively have to put the whole hexagon that is visible now into the PNG, and leave a hole in the middle. This will work but it's not very flexible (not that I'd have a better idea...) –  Pekka 웃 Jun 2 '10 at 22:10
    
Make sure that the elements are positioned absolutely, with position:absolute. You will also meed to make sure that the parent element has the attribute position:relative, so the elements are all positioned relative to the same parent. Then, of course, make sure that your z-indexes stacks your elements in the order you want. If you post some code, I could take a look at it. –  Jeff Fohl Jun 2 '10 at 22:11
    
@Pekka - Yes, that would be one option. You could also just use the part of the hexagon that you want to block the slider below. So, it would be one facet of the hexagon. –  Jeff Fohl Jun 2 '10 at 22:12
    
@Jeff mmm, look at the white space outside the hexagon. You'd have to mask that as well, otherwise the sliding content will be visible there... I can't really think of a way to do this except to have the full hexagon's area in one image. Of course, I can be wrong. –  Pekka 웃 Jun 2 '10 at 22:15

Eric Meyer's curvelicious concept and demo might point you in the right direction. It's a complicated hack from the "early days of CSS", but it's a powerful technique.

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If it was me developing, I would make that two layer link of yours, into a tree layer...

ex:

1. Layer with the existing background

2. Layer with the gray hexagon

3. Layer with the surrounding words and the surrounding background

Like that, when you click the left and right arrows, the gray hexagon will me sliding in the middle of the 1. and 3. layers, thus preventing that ugliness that you've mentioned :)

Hope it helps!

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