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// A : Parent
@implementation A
-(id) init
{
    // change self here then return it
}
@end A

A *a = [[A alloc] init];

a. Just wondering, if self is a local variable or global? If it's local then what is the point of self = [super init] in init? I can successfully define some local variable and use like this, why would I need to assign it to self.

-(id) init
{
    id tmp = [super init];
    if(tmp != nil) {
        //do stuff
    }
    return tmp;
}

b. If [super init] returns some other object instance and I have to overwrite self then I will not be able to access A's methods any more, since it will be completely new object? Am I right?

c. super and self pointing to the same memory and the major difference between them is method lookup order. Am I right?

sorry, don't have Mac to try, learning theory as for now...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Dreamlax's answer is correct... but, clarification may be helpful.

a. Just wondering, if self is a local variable or global? If it's local then what is the point of self = [super init] in init? I can successfully define some local variable and use like this, why would I need to assign it to self.

self is not a local variable. It is an argument to the method call. The first argument, in fact. The second argument is _cmd, the name of the selector of the method being executed.

What is special about self is that self is used by the compiler to access instance variables. That is, if you say self = [super init] and the superclass's init happens to return something different, any further instance variable accesses will still be correct.

b. If [super init] returns some other object instance and I have to overwrite self then I will not be able to access A's methods any more, since it will be completely new object? Am I right?

If super's init returns an instance of something that is incompatible with A, then something has gone horribly awry in the design of the superclass. Keep in mind that Objective-C is fully dynamic. Thus, there is no reason that whatever is returned by super's init actually needs to be an instance of A, but it better had damned well act like an A. Now, it could be a completely new instance of a subclass of A and, thus, all of the methods of A will work just fine.

Reading between the lines; remember that Objective-C is fully dynamic. There is no such thing as static method dispatch. The class of an object could change at any time and any random method call will still work as long as the new class responds to the method. Not that this actually happens at runtime, just that it could.

c. super and self pointing to the same memory and the major difference between them is method lookup order. Am I right?

Now, this is the fun question. super doesn't really point to anything. For all intents and purposes, super can be treated as the one bit of magic in this. That is, when the compiler sees super as the target of a method call, it compiles it as a slightly different call site that calls through to one of the variants of objc_msgSendSuper() which -- as name implies -- effectively "searches" for the method's implementation starting in the parent class of the class within which the call was compiled.

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  1. Self is an argument provided to the method implementation. All Objective-C instance and class methods have two implicit arguments that precede the method's arguments. The implicit arguments are self and _cmd. _cmd is the selector used to determine the method implementation.

  2. If super returns an instance of a different class, then that would be the case, but it is also possible that it may return a different instance of the same class.

  3. super is a keyword, not a variable. It informs the compiler to use a different runtime function that begins method resolution at one class higher than the current class.

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Thanks, but doesn't answer first question fully - why do I need self = [super init] and can't use any local variable to do that job. –  Pablo Jun 3 '10 at 2:11
    
@Michael: Because you need to invoke your superclass's initialiser, and because your superclass's initialiser (or its superclass's initialiser) may return a different instance; if you do not change self, then you will not be initialising the correct instance and you will also return the wrong instance to whatever called your initialiser. It is very, very rare for a superclass's initialiser to return a different instance so many people at their discretion don't bother assigning the result of [super init] to self, but personally I always do. It is an idiom of the language. –  dreamlax Jun 3 '10 at 2:17
    
What I don't understand is the point where self is really changed. If self is an argument, then is it passed by reference so when I change it the original value will also be changed? Otherwise if the change occurs after returning, outside of init, when I instantiate A then I can use the tmp var to do it. –  Pablo Jun 3 '10 at 2:23
    
@Michael: Inside -init, self will be the return value from +alloc. +alloc returned some pointer to some address that contains enough space for all of the instance variables, etc. The runtime passes the return value of +alloc to -init. If you change self inside -init and return a different self, then this different self will be the one that is assigned to x in the statement SomeClass *x = [[SomeClass alloc] init];. –  dreamlax Jun 3 '10 at 2:56
    
@dreamlax: that is logical, if I return value from init it will be assigned to x. However, something I can't understand... there is nothing in your words that bounds me using self. I can assign and return any variable from -init and x will take its value. –  Pablo Jun 3 '10 at 4:38

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