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Can someone explain this behaviour?

test.c:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d, %d\n", (int) (300.6000/0.05000), (int) (300.65000/0.05000));
    printf("%f, %f\n", (300.6000/0.05000), (300.65000/0.05000));
    return 0;
}

$ gcc test.c

$ ./a.out
6012, 6012
6012.000000, 6013.000000

I checked the assembly code and it puts both the arguments of the first printf as 6012, so it seems to be a compile time bug.

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5  
search for precision/rounding –  Mitch Wheat Jun 3 '10 at 4:35
    
If it was a precision/rounding error, wouldn't the second line also have both as 6012? And as I said, there is 6012 in the assembly for the first line, so the compiler is calculating it during compile-time. –  kartikmohta Jun 3 '10 at 4:44
1  
finding a complier bug in such a simple piece of code is very very very unlikely. –  Naveen Jun 3 '10 at 4:45
2  
It's high enough (> 6012.999999) that printf prints 6013.000000, but it's still between 6012 and 6013, so it truncates to 6012. –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 3 '10 at 4:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Run

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d, %d\n", (int) (300.6000/0.05000), (int) (300.65000/0.05000));
    printf("%.20f %.20f\n", (300.6000/0.05000), (300.65000/0.05000));
    return 0;
}

and it should be more clear. The value of the second one (after floating point division, which is not exact) is ~6012.9999999999991, so when you truncate it with (int), gcc is smart enough to put in 6012 at compile time.

When you print the floats, printf by default formats them for display with only 6 digits of precision, which means the second prints as 6013.000000.

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Thanks, I really didn't work it out properly... should have spotted this easily. –  kartikmohta Jun 3 '10 at 4:49

printf() rounds floating point numbers when you print them. If you add more precision you can see what's happening:

$ cat gccfloat.c
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d, %d\n", (int) (300.6000/0.05000), (int) (300.65000/0.05000));
    printf("%.15f, %.15f\n", (300.6000/0.05000), (300.65000/0.05000));
    return 0;
}

$ ./gccfloat
6012, 6012
6012.000000000000000, 6012.999999999999091
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Sounds like a rounding error. 300.65000/0.05000 is being calculated (floating point) as something like 6012.99999999. When casting as an int, it gets truncated to 6012. Of course this is all being precalculated in the compiler optimizations, so the final binary just contains the value 6012, which is what you're seeing.

The reason you don't see the same in your second statement is because it's being rounded for display by printf, and not truncated, as is what happens when you cast to int. (See @John Kugelman's answer.)

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