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I think it is not mandatory to have a default constructor in a class (C#).

So in that situation shall I have a empty constructor in the class or I can skip it?

Is it a best practice to have a default empty constructor?

Class test
{
public test()
{

}
        ......
}

or

Class test
{
            ......
}
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9 Answers 9

up vote 28 down vote accepted

If you won't need that class will be used by any third party and you won't need to add overloaded constructor in future, don't write an empty constructor.

But...

Let's assume that you already shipped the product and other third parties has been using your class. After a few months, there is one new requirement comes and you decided to add one constructor with name parameter.

When you add another overloaded constructor in version 2, the C# compiler won't generate the default constructor. If you forgot to add empty constructor explicitly, all other third party code will be break.

IMO, I always define empty constructor (one liner) on the public classes if those will be used by third parties.

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3  
On another topic, if you want to use your .NET class in a COM program, a public no-args constructor will be required - for the same reasons as Soe Moe explained, I would explicitly put it in the class. –  Jean Hominal Jun 3 '10 at 9:38
3  
You could argue that your own unit tests should fail if you're going to break 3rd party clients in this way. –  Jon Nov 7 '13 at 1:45

KISS - If your class doesn't need to do anything in the default constructor - don't define it. The compiler will generate one for you.

From the horse's mouth:

Unless the class is static, classes without constructors are given a public default constructor by the C# compiler in order to enable class instantiation.

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1  
To clarify: If your class does have at least one constructor that has one or more parameters, then the C# compiler will not create a default constructor for you. In that case, you may want to explicitly create a default constructor, even if it does not do anything (i.e., it is empty). (See the accepted answer and others for more.) –  DavidRR Dec 31 '13 at 14:58

There's nothing like default constructors. It's public parameter-less constructor in C#. C# compiler will look for constructors in a class while compiling and will add a public parameter-less constructor if no constructors are defined. So it's ok to skip defining a constructor if your class objects don't need any special operation for construction.

Secondly, if you define one constructor with parameter then compiler will not add a public parameter-less constructor because compiler will assume your objects must be constructed via the constructor you've defined. Having said that, you must explicitly define a parameter-less constructor if you have at least one parameterized constructor, if you need your objects to construct with parameteress constructor.

You can also have a private parameterless constructor as well that is instrumental in making singleton classes.

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If you don't need a parameterless constructor, don't add one with an empty body. However, if someone wants to serialize/deserialize objects of your class, then you'll need a parameterless constructor.

If you define no constructors, then the compiler will automatically generate a default parameterless one for you, but it won't if you define a constructor yourself.

Incidentally, you can suppress the C# compiler's automatically generated default constructor by defining an empty, private constructor.

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The C# compiler will create the default constructor for you, so you should not write parameterless one, with an empty body.

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Experience coders have told me that not having it has caused problems for them in the future e.g. static classes –  CodeBlend Mar 7 '13 at 12:22

By default C# will add a zero parameter constructor for you. So don't add one if you don't have anything special to do there.

You will have to add any empty constructor yourself - even without code - if you have another constructor with parameters and want have to keep the parameter-less constructor alive.

Another scenario where you would want to add an empty parameter-less constructor is if you want to change its access modifier from public to something else(private, protected or internal)

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The only times I would include an empty parameterless constructor is if I want the constructor to be private or if I want a parameterless constructor to call another overload with null as the parameter. BTW, in your example above you've made Test's constructor private by not specifying public.

class Foo
{
    public Foo()
        : this(null)
    {
    }

    public Foo(string bar)
    {
        if (bar != null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(bar);
        }
    }
}
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I have modified the code. –  Ram Jun 3 '10 at 6:48
    
OK, the reason I noted it is because a private constructor can be useful for forcing users of your class to use any factory methods you may decide to include in your class. For example my Foo class could have a public static Foo CreateFoo() factory method and no public constructors... –  Nate Jun 3 '10 at 7:03

Dont write an empty constructor it would be created by default

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YAGNI (http://c2.com/xp/YouArentGonnaNeedIt.html)

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