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I've made this code:

window.setInterval(function(){ var a = doStuff(); var b = a + 5; }, 60000)

The actual contents of the anonymous function is of course just for this small example as it doesn't matter. What really happens is a bunch of variables get created in the scope of the function itself, because I don't need/want to pollute the global space.

But as you all know, the doStuff() function won't be called until 60 seconds in the page. I would also like to call the function right now, as soon as the page is loaded, and from then on every 60 seconds too.

Is it somehow possible to call the function without copy/pasting the inside code to right after the setInterval() line? As I said, I don't want to pollute the global space with useless variables that aren't needed outside the function.

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Create the function outside the interval and put it into a variable? –  Pekka 웃 Jun 3 '10 at 8:04
1  
I know, but that's what I'm trying to avoid, if possible. –  Tominator Jun 3 '10 at 8:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can put your callback function in a variable, and wrap up everything in a self-invoking anonymous function:

(function () {
    var callback = function() { 
        var a = doStuff(); 
        var b = a + 5; 
    };

    callback();

    window.setInterval(callback, 60000);
})();

No pollution.

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3  
+1 while the below code is totally valid, I consider it to be annoying to read. –  Warty Jun 3 '10 at 8:17
    
Cool, this works nicely! –  Tominator Jun 3 '10 at 8:19

This is possible without creating global variables as well:

setInterval((function fn() {
 console.log('foo'); // Your code goes here
 return fn;
})(), 5000);

Actually, this way, you don’t create any variables at all.

However, in Internet Explorer, the fn function will become accessible from the surrounding scope (due to a bug). If you don’t want that to happen, simply wrap everything in a self-invoking anonymous function:

(function() {
 setInterval((function fn() {
  console.log('foo'); // Your code goes here
  return fn;
 })(), 5000);
})();

Credit to Paul Irish for sharing this trick.


Edit: Answer updated with some more information, thanks to bobince.

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1  
-1 nope this doesn't conform to the requirement. It creates fn in the global space. Thats the problem with clever tricks, its hard to predict what they are actually doing. –  AnthonyWJones Jun 3 '10 at 8:20
1  
@AnthonyWJones and @ItzWarty: Easy enough to fix — just wrap the whole in a self-invoking anonymous function. I edited my answer. @AnthonyWJones: IIRC, the requirement was to avoid global variables, not functions. –  Mathias Bynens Jun 3 '10 at 8:23
1  
Actually, Anthony can be right or wrong. It matters, what scope is the code put into? If the code is put into a window.onload, it's not global, it's a private function inside window.onload... @Mathias Bynens: While the code is clever, it's not exactly legible. I will +1 for the cleverness, though. –  Warty Jun 3 '10 at 8:24
1  
Ack. My sillyness. I skipped the contents of your fn() function mentally, so I failed to notice you returned the function itself. Of course that works then :-) And i don't know if it creates the function in global space. Closures are hard, my head fails at them. –  Tominator Jun 3 '10 at 8:26
2  
It shouldn't create the function in the surrounding scope even without the wrapper. It's only in IE that it does, due to a long-standing JScript bug. What's more, in IE only, the returned fn is not actually the same function instance as the one being called to return it! For these reasons, named inline function expressions should normally be avoided. –  bobince Jun 3 '10 at 8:31

yet another solution:

(function() { 
    var a = doStuff(); 
    var b = a + 5; 
    window.setTimeout(arguments.callee, 60000);
})();

This uses timeout instead of interval so that it can run the first time and then run it's self again after a timeout.

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