Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i'm just a begginer in perl, and very urgently need to prepare a small script that takes top 3 things from an xml file and puts them in a new one. Here's an example of an xml file:

    <article>
  {lot of other stuff here}
</article>
<article>
  {lot of other stuff here}
</article>
<article>
  {lot of other stuff here}
</article>
<article>
  {lot of other stuff here}
</article>

What i'd like to do is to get first 3 items along with all the tags in between and put it into another file. Thanks for all the help in advance regards peter

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How can I use Perl regular expressions to parse XML data? –  Quentin Jun 3 '10 at 9:28
    
@SMark: Even if. -- Perl6 regular expressions are still the wrong tool for that. ;-) –  Tomalak Jun 3 '10 at 9:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Never ever use Regex to handle markup languages.

The original version of this answer (see below) used XML::XPath. Grant McLean said in the comments:

XML::XPath is an old and unmaintained module. XML::LibXML is a modern, maintained module with an almost identical API and it's faster too.

so I made a new version that uses XML::LibXML (thanks, Grant):

use warnings;
use strict;
use XML::LibXML;

my $doc   = XML::LibXML->load_xml(location => 'articles.xml');
my $xp    = XML::LibXML::XPathContext->new($doc->documentElement);
my $xpath = '/articles/article[position() < 4]';

foreach my $article ( $xp->findnodes($xpath) ) {
  # now do something with $article
  print $article.": ".$article->getName."\n";
}

For me this prints:

XML::LibXML::Element=SCALAR(0x346ef90): article
XML::LibXML::Element=SCALAR(0x346ef30): article
XML::LibXML::Element=SCALAR(0x346efa8): article

Links to the relevant documentation:


Original version of the answer, based on the XML::XPath package:

use warnings;
use strict;
use XML::XPath;

my $xp    = XML::XPath->new(filename => 'articles.xml');
my $xpath = '/articles/article[position() < 4]';

foreach my $article ( $xp->findnodes($xpath)->get_nodelist ) {
  # now do something with $article
  print $article.": ".$article->getName ."\n";
}

which prints this for me:

XML::XPath::Node::Element=REF(0x38067b8): article
XML::XPath::Node::Element=REF(0x38097e8): article
XML::XPath::Node::Element=REF(0x3809ae8): article

Have a look at the docs to find out what you can do with them.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is one case where a regex could easily do the job though. –  Snake Plissken Jun 3 '10 at 11:15
5  
@Snake Plissken: No, it isn't. Regex is never the right tool for that kind of job, no matter how "easy" it seems. XPath+Programming Language X (Perl in this case) is, or XSLT is. Regex is not. –  Tomalak Jun 3 '10 at 11:20
    
You're being silly. In this case a regex can easily do the job. What are you going to do in the case that someone asks you to copy a non-XML file until something has been seen three times? –  Snake Plissken Jun 3 '10 at 11:26
2  
@Snake Plissken: I'm not being silly. I'm just trying to avoid being smart about when to use a proper parser. There is a nice XML parser built into Perl, there is absolutely no reason not to use it. (It's not "oh damn, I have to use a parser because this is too complex for regex", it's "oh damn, I can't use a parser because the language I use does not supply one". And the latter is almost never true.) –  Tomalak Jun 3 '10 at 13:49
1  
FYI, XML::XPath is an old and unmaintained module. XML::LibXML is a modern, maintained module with an almost identical API and it's faster too. –  Grant McLean Jun 4 '10 at 1:03

Here:

 open my $input, "<", "file.xml" or die $!;
 open my $output, ">", "truncated-file.xml" or die $!;
 my $n_articles = 0;
 while (<$input>) {
      print $output $_;
      if (m:</article>:) {
           $n_articles++;
           if ($n_articles >= 3) {
                last;
           }
      }
 }         
 close $input or die $!;
 close $output or die $!;

You really don't need an XML parser to do such a simple job.

share|improve this answer
    
What that script did is it copied all the contents of the file.xml into truncated-file.xml –  dusker Jun 3 '10 at 13:19
    
Then it's debugging time for you. Anyway there is another answer you can use if this doesn't work. –  Snake Plissken Jun 4 '10 at 3:16
    
Would you mind sharing that another solution? thanks –  dusker Jun 4 '10 at 5:33
    
I was referring to the other answer on this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/2964637/… –  Snake Plissken Jun 4 '10 at 7:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.