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I'm a student of computer science and we have to use BaseX (a pure Java OSS XML database) in one of our courses. While browsing through the code I discovered the following piece of code:

  /**
    * Returns a md5 hash.
    * @param pw password string
    * @return hash
    */
   public static String md5(final String pw) {
     try {
       final MessageDigest md = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
       md.update(Token.token(pw));
       final TokenBuilder tb = new TokenBuilder();
       for(final byte b : md.digest()) {
         final int h = b >> 4 & 0x0F;
         tb.add((byte) (h + (h > 9 ? 0x57 : 0x30)));
         final int l = b & 0x0F;
         tb.add((byte) (l + (l > 9 ? 0x57 : 0x30)));
       }
       return tb.toString();
     } catch(final Exception ex) {
       Main.notexpected(ex);
       return pw;
     }
   }

(source: https://svn.uni-konstanz.de/dbis/basex/trunk/basex/src/main/java/org/basex/util/Token.java)

Just out of interest: what is happening there? Why these byte operations after the MD5? The docstring is saying it returns a MD5 hash...does it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I didn't look up the definitions for the classes used, but the byte operations seem to be encoding the returned byte array into a string of hex characters.

for(final byte b : md.digest()) {
  // get high 4 bytes of current byte
  final int h = b >> 4 & 0x0F;
  // convert into hex digit (0x30 is '0' while 0x57+10 is 'a')
  tb.add((byte) (h + (h > 9 ? 0x57 : 0x30))); 
  // the same for the bottom 4 bits
  final int l = b & 0x0F;
  tb.add((byte) (l + (l > 9 ? 0x57 : 0x30)));
}

This is a great example of why using magic numbers is bad. I, for one, honestly couldn't remember that 0x57+10 is the ASCII/Unicode codepoint for 'a' without checking it in a Python interpreter.

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Thx for the clarification –  Martin Thurau Jun 5 '10 at 12:29

This is a great example of why using magic numbers is bad.

Well, this is a core method, which isn't supposed to be modified by others – and this looks like the most efficient way to do it. But, true, the documentation could be better. Talking about core methods, it's worthwhile looking at code like Integer.getChars():

http://www.java2s.com/Open-Source/Java-Document/6.0-JDK-Core/lang/java/lang/Integer.java.htm

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No matter how "core" your code is, it will eventually be read by someone (like just now) and therefore it should be readable. Efficiency wouldn't be sacrificed by writing the expressions in a more readable format, or at least leaving a comment for the poor reader. –  Matti Virkkunen Jun 5 '10 at 12:35

I guess Matti is right - as the md.digest() returns an byte[] and BaseX uses Tokens in favor of Strings (thus the TokenBuilder). So the conversion from md.digest() to String is done via a conversion of Digest-Hex to Token.

Not exactly easy to read but quite similar to what Apache Commons does in their Codec Library to get the String value of a md5 hash.

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