Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my app, I want to find/calculate the audio frequency as dynamically when i am recording an audio and no need to save, play and all. Now i am trying to do that with help of an aurioToch sample code. In that sample, inside FFTBufferManager class methods such as GrabAudioData and ComputeFFT,Here I am not able to find where they are calculating frequency value as dynamically depends on the audio sound and I spent more than 5 days.please help me.

share|improve this question
    
Dude, there is not just one frequency value. Fast Fourier Transform gives you a value for every frequency (range) as in this image. owlnet.rice.edu/~elec301/Projects02/adaptiveFilters/images/… If you really want, you could pick out a dominant frequency, but there may not be one. –  Hamish Grubijan Jun 3 '10 at 14:23
    
"""Here I am not able to find where they are calculating frequency value as dynamically depends on the audio sound and I spent more than 5 days.please help me.""" - I do not understand. To calculate weights of frequencies you need a sample of some length. If you are talking about "rolling" calculations, try taking the last 30 sec window or so ... –  Hamish Grubijan Jun 3 '10 at 14:25
    
@Hamish Grubijan, thanks for your reply, i want to calculate show the frequency continuously while recording an audio. –  Sivanathan Jun 3 '10 at 15:31
    
I suggest starting with basics. Install Python and SciPy and play with fft a bit. Go here: scipy.org/… and then search for fft. –  Hamish Grubijan Jun 3 '10 at 15:38
    
The reason why I recommend Python is that you can get a working prototype in 20 lines of code or less. –  Hamish Grubijan Jun 3 '10 at 15:53
add comment

1 Answer

You don't need to use FFT if your audio signal is clear and pure. Just count the peaks and valleys. Or just peaks. Take that number and divide by the number of samples in your buffer, and then multiply by the sample rate. That's your frequency value.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.