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I have a function, a(), that I want to override, but also have the original a() be performed in an order depending on the context. For example, sometimes when I'm generating a page I'll want to override like this:

function a() {
    new_code();
    original_a();
}

and sometimes like this:

function a() {
    original_a();
    other_new_code();
}

How do I get that original_a() from within the over-riding a()? Is it even possible?

Please don't suggest alternatives to over-riding in this way, I know of many. I'm asking about this way specifically.

share|improve this question
up vote 147 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

var a = (function() {
    var original_a = a;

    if (condition) {
        return function() {
            new_code();
            original_a();
        }
    } else {
        return function() {
            original_a();
            other_new_code();
        }
    }
})();

Declaring original_a inside an anonymous function keeps it from cluttering the global namespace, but it's available in the inner functions.

Like Nermaster mentioned in the comments, be sure to include the () at the end. You want to call the outer function and store the result (one of the two inner functions) in a, not store the outer function itself in a.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That's very helpful. – Kev Nov 17 '08 at 20:06
    
wow. ultra cool – naveen Mar 4 '11 at 3:54
12  
For any idiots out there like myself - pay close attention to the "()" at the end - without that, it returns the outer function, not the inner functions :) – Nerdmaster Jul 24 '12 at 18:27
    
@Nerdmaster Thanks for pointing that out. I added a note to hopefully help people notice. – Matthew Crumley Jul 24 '12 at 20:11
3  
Wow, I tried to do this without a namespace and I got an stack overflow, lol. – gosukiwi Aug 10 '12 at 17:00

The Proxy pattern might help you:

(function() {
    // log all calls to setArray
    var proxied = jQuery.fn.setArray;
    jQuery.fn.setArray = function() {
        console.log( this, arguments );
        return proxied.apply( this, arguments );
    };
})();

The above wraps its code in a function to hide the "proxied"-variable. It saves jQuery's setArray-method in a closure and overwrites it. The proxy then logs all calls to the method and delegates the call to the original. Using apply(this, arguments) guarantees that the caller won't be able to notice the difference between the original and the proxied method.

share|improve this answer
3  
indeed. the usage of 'apply' and 'arguments' makes this far more robust than the other answers – Robert Levy May 21 '12 at 19:15
3  
You have no idea how much I just learned from that link. Thank you sir – notbad.jpeg May 5 '13 at 4:37

Thanks guys the proxy pattern really helped.....Actually I wanted to call a global function foo.. In certain pages i need do to some checks. So I did the following.

//Saving the original func
var org_foo = window.foo;

//Assigning proxy fucnc
window.foo = function(args){
    //Performing checks
    if(checkCondition(args)){
        //Calling original funcs
        org_foo(args);
    }
};

Thnx this really helped me out

share|improve this answer

You can override a function using a construct like:

function override(f, g) {
    return function() {
        return g(f);
    }:
}

For example:

 a = override(a, function(original_a) {
      if (condition) { new_code(); original_a(); }
      else { original_a(); other_new_code(); }
 });
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is so much more readable than the other proxy pattern examples! – Mu Mind May 26 '11 at 17:42
1  
...but if I'm not mistaken, this is limited to zero-argument functions, or some predetermined number of arguments at least. Is there some way to generalize it to arbitrary numbers of arguments without losing the readability? – Mu Mind May 26 '11 at 17:48
    
@MuMind: yes, but using the proxy pattern properly - see my answer. – Dan Dascalescu Mar 22 '14 at 2:10

Passing arbitrary arguments:

a = override(a, function(original_a) {
    if (condition) { new_code(); original_a.apply(this, arguments) ; }
    else { original_a.apply(this, arguments); other_new_code(); }
});
share|improve this answer
1  
wont arguments refer to original_a though? – Jonathan. Apr 6 '13 at 9:42

The examples above don't correctly apply this or pass arguments correctly to the function override. Underscore _.wrap() wraps existing functions, applies this and passes arguments correctly. See: http://underscorejs.org/#wrap

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I had some code written by someone else and wanted to add a line to a function which i could not find in the code. So as a workaround I wanted to override it.

None of the solutions worked for me though.

Here is what worked in my case:

if (typeof originalFunction === "undefined") {
    originalFunction = targetFunction;
    targetFunction = function(x, y) {
        //Your code
        originalFunction(a, b);
        //Your Code
    };  
}
share|improve this answer

I've created a small helper for a similar scenario because I often needed to override functions from several libraries. This helper accepts a "namespace" (the function container), the function name, and the overriding function. It will replace the original function in the referred namespace with the new one.

The new function accepts the original function as the first argument, and the original functions arguments as the rest. It will preserve the context everytime. It supports void and non-void functions as well.

function overrideFunction(namespace, baseFuncName, func) {
    var originalFn = namespace[baseFuncName];
    namespace[baseFuncName] = function () {
        return func.apply(this, [originalFn.bind(this)].concat(Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0)));
    };
}

Usage for example with Bootstrap:

overrideFunction($.fn.popover.Constructor.prototype, 'leave', function(baseFn, obj) {
    // ... do stuff before base call
    baseFn(obj);
    // ... do stuff after base call
});

I didn't create any performance tests though. It can possibly add some unwanted overhead which can or cannot be a big deal, depending on scenarios.

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