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I use the Registry class to manage values in the Registry on Windows Seven in C#.

Registry.GetValue(...);

But, I'm facing a curious behavior : Every time, the returned value is the correct one, but sometimes, it is followed by an unexpected "?"

When I check the Registry, (regedit), the "?" doesn't exist. I really don't understand from where this question mark come from.

Info :

  • C#
  • 3.5 framework
  • windows 7 64 bits (and i want my application to work on both 32 and 64 bits systems)
share|improve this question
    
A couple of questions for you,.. (1) Is it differing registry keys that are returning values suffixed with "?", or is it only a subset? (2) Have you tried compiling targeting 64bit and 32bit and confirming that it occurs when targeting both specifically? – Rob Jun 3 '10 at 14:14
7  
Also, is that an actual question mark character, or is it some other unprintable character? – John Saunders Jun 3 '10 at 14:16
    
@Rob : (1) I made my tests on only one key (2) I didn't try. I compil a ddl that is loaded by another soft (AutoCAD), that can be 32 bits or 64 bis. @ John Saunders : I have to check. I get a "?" when I log the value. – Wilhelm Peraud Jun 3 '10 at 14:35
    
It seems that it is not a "?". The test EndsWith("?") fails even when my logs show me a "?". Is there any method that could check for an unpritable character ? – Wilhelm Peraud Jun 3 '10 at 14:59
1  
Why do you think the last character is ?. It's far more likely that it's a unicode character which can't be converted to ANSI... I'd access the last character and dump it as an integer. – Larry Osterman Jun 7 '10 at 1:37

That didn't quite work for me, I was also getting a random ? at the end of a value from the registry that was a file path. It only appeared every now and again. It seems like a bug.

I use 2 pass method to see if directory exists and then strip out characters, I was getting unicode character 1792 at the end. < 128 probably won't work for some languages.

string configPath = val.ToString();
bool dirExists = false;
if (Directory.Exists(configPath))
{
    dirExists = true;
}
else
{

    _logger.Warn("The path for service {0} doesn't exist: {1}", serviceName, configPath);

    StringBuilder configPathBuilder = new StringBuilder(configPath.Length);

    // Do this to remove any dodgy characters in the path like a ? at end
    char[] inValidChars = Path.GetInvalidPathChars();
    foreach (Char c in configPath.ToCharArray())
    {
        if (inValidChars.Contains(c) == false && c < 128)
        {
            configPathBuilder.Append(c);
        }
        else
        {
            _logger.Warn("An invalid path was character was found in the path: {0} {1}", c, (int)c);
        }
    }

    configPath = configPathBuilder.ToString();

    if (Directory.Exists(configPath))
    {
        dirExists = true;
    }

}
share|improve this answer

So my question is, "who set the value"?

Perhaps whoever did the setting put in an unprintable character at the end of the string. It is probably not actually a question mark. This may be a result of a bug in the program which did the setting, not anything to do with your code, per se.

share|improve this answer
    
Here are some answers : The key has been set by me on "HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\MySoft\" I set a value that corresponds to a file path (keyname : "path", value "C:\....\MyFile.txt" When I get the value, I just want to get this filePath. I made a test, that only get this value and LOG this value. I ran this test a few times (everytime on the same key). Most of time I got the correct filePath ("C:\....\MyFile.txt"), and a few times, "C:\....\MyFile.txt?" – Wilhelm Peraud Jun 3 '10 at 14:29

I found a way to remove the unexpected char, thanks to all your comments ;)

 String value = null;
        try
        {
            foreach (Char item in Registry.GetValue(registryKey, key, "").ToString().ToCharArray())
            {
                if (Char.GetUnicodeCategory(item) != System.Globalization.UnicodeCategory.OtherLetter && Char.GetUnicodeCategory(item) != System.Globalization.UnicodeCategory.OtherNotAssigned)
                {
                    value += item;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            LOG.Error("Unable to get value of " + key + ex, ex);
        }
        return value;

I made some tests to know what kind of char appears from time to time. It was, just like you said Larry, an unicode problem. I still don't understand why this char appears sometimes.

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