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This code works:

  my $href = shift @_;    # get reference to hash
  my %h = %{$href};       # dereference hash

This one does not:

  my %h = %{shift @_};

As well as this one:

  my %h = ${$_[0]}

Why?

=============================

One more time to be precisly:

 1 #!/usr/bin/perl -w
  2 use strict;
  3 use warnings;
  4 
  5 my %h;
  6 sub a {
  7     
  8     # that works - result 1
  9     my $href = $_[0] || shift;
 10     %h = %{$href};
 11     
 12     # that does not work - result 0
 13     # my %h = %{$_[0]};
 14     
 15     # as well as that one - result 0
 16     # my %h = %{shift @_};
 17     $h{1}=2;
 18 }
 19 
 20 a(\%h);
 21 print scalar (keys %h) . "\n";

In other words line 16 - it doesn't.

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I updated my answer, your problem is totally unrelated. –  Evan Carroll Jun 3 '10 at 16:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This will work.

  my %h = %{shift @_};

This won't.

  my %h = ${$_[0]} # not ${$_[0]}

That sigil is supposed to be %

  my %h = %{$_[0]}

also, use warnings;, and use strict;


HINT: The reason your above example doesn't work, is only one example doesn't declare a lexical variable %h = %{$href}; is not my %h = %{$href};

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1  
Does anyone not use warnings and strict? –  Demosthenex Jun 3 '10 at 15:45
    
@demosthenex: yes, lots of people unfortunately. –  Ether Jun 3 '10 at 15:59
    
thx for the help. That was really stupid mistake. –  name Jun 3 '10 at 16:27

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