Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to T-SQL command MERGE so I found a place in my SQL logic where I can use it and want to test it but can't figure out how exactly should I use it:

IF (EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM commissions_history WHERE request = @requestID))
    UPDATE commissions_history
    SET amount = @amount
    WHERE request = @requestID
ELSE
    INSERT INTO commissions_history (amount) VALUES @amount)

Please suggest the proper usage. Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Did you look in the help? Here's a simple example:

MERGE dbo.commissions_history AS target
USING (SELECT @amount, @requestID) AS source (amount, request)
ON (target.request = source.request)
WHEN MATCHED THEN
    UPDATE SET amount = source.amount
WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN
    INSERT (request, amount)
    VALUES (source.request, source.amount);
share|improve this answer
    
Here is a simple walkthrough of your simple example :) stackoverflow.com/a/10219581/261997 –  RThomas Apr 18 '12 at 23:31

I hope it will work

MERGE commissions_history AS target
USING (SELECT request FROM  commissions_history WHERE request = @requestID) AS source (request)
ON (target.request = source.request)
WHEN MATCHED THEN 
    UPDATE SET amount = @amount
WHEN NOT MATCHED BY SOURCE    
    INSERT (request, amount)
    VALUES (@requestID,  @amount)
share|improve this answer
3  
The insert part of that won't work, because your source select will return an empty recordset, which it will then try to merge –  Tom H. Jun 3 '10 at 16:41
2  
In the update, source.amount is from the taable commisions_history, but needs to be from the variable @Amount. –  Shannon Severance Jun 3 '10 at 16:44
    
@Tom H, @Shannon Severance: Thanks for comments. I've changed it. Anyway, Tom H's is more clear. –  a1ex07 Jun 3 '10 at 17:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.