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I'm developing windows form application. I need to implement the singleton design pattern. When implementing the singleton in two classes which are in same package it works correctly but implementing the two classes in different package by just creating objects for both classes in that class. How can I implement that? Here is code:

public class Singleton
{
   private static Singleton instance;
   B b=new B();
   private Singleton() {}

   public static Singleton Instance
   {
      get 
      {
         if (instance == null)
         {
            instance = new Singleton();
         }
         return instance;
      }
   }

public void a()
{
}
b.c();
}


public class B
{
SingleTon single=new SingleTon.Instance;
single.a()
public void c()
{
}
}
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2  
"Not working" is not an enough explanation of what you are doing there. –  zerkms Jun 4 '10 at 4:40
1  
Show me some code. –  this. __curious_geek Jun 4 '10 at 4:40
    
Take notice you use SingleTon in your B class when actually its name Singleton. names in c# case sensitive. –  Arseny Jun 4 '10 at 6:48
1  
The code shown is far from compiling... –  Regent Jun 4 '10 at 8:50
    
You can use private static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton(); (Static fields are initialized in .NET on the first use) That way you don't need to check whether instance is null in the property's getter. –  Regent Jun 4 '10 at 8:54

3 Answers 3

The idea of the Singleton pattern is to use the same object and not to create a new one. Apart from all the syntax errors in you code snippet, you shouldn't be trying to create a 'new' Singleton. Instead in class B you should have a line like this: private Singleton singleton = Singleton.Instance; The way you wrote it, it wouldn't compile because the Singleton's constructor is not visible in class B.

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First, if you are exposing this outside the project, please consider using Abstract Factory Pattern instead of Singleton. See my own question for why this can get out of hand.

But, if you must, start small:

public class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    private Singleton() { }
    public static Singleton Instance { get { return instance; } }
    public void a(B b)
    {
        b.c();
    }
}

public class B
{
    static void Main()
    {
        B b = new B();
        Singleton.Instance.a(b);
    }

    public void c()
    {
        // whatever you want it to do
    }
}

But, you should be forewarned that this creates a very tight coupling (almost a deadlock) between Singleton and B, which means you (as the library creator) must know about every class B that will be using this. Consider a very different design here, because this is a horrible way to implement Singleton. I almost hate to even post this code, but am doing so with this disclaimer in tow.

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The code you wrote here should work(sure Instence is method i suppose?..), also the different projects shouldn't be a problem, because you have public accessor everywhere, where is needed. May be you have a bit different problem?

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-1 This code will not even compile, much less "should work". –  drharris Jun 4 '10 at 20:07

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