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I have the following code which is seems to be lead to the infinite loop:

struct X
{
  void my_func( int ) { std::cout << "Converted to int" << std::endl; }
};

struct X2 : X
{
  void my_func( char value ) { my_func(value); }
};

What is the problem with it?

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3  
There's no program here, just two class definitions. It does not and cannot hang. In fact, it can't be run. Post real code that you are trying to run. –  AnT Jun 4 '10 at 6:10
1  
Most of us were able to fill in the blanks. Just sayin'... –  Igor Zevaka Jun 4 '10 at 8:14
    
@Igor Zevaka: Certainly. But in 9 cases out of 10 "filling in the blanks" produces a useless answer to a meaningless question. I hope this one proves to be that 1 out of 10 when it works. –  AnT Jun 4 '10 at 17:31

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The second bit is infinitely recursive:

struct X2 : X
{
  void my_func( char value ) { my_func(value); } //calls itself over and over again
};

Prefix my_func with the name of the base class and you will be OK

struct X2 : X
{
  void my_func( char value ) { X::my_func(value); }
};

EDIT Just realised that base class my_func's signature is different. C++ compiler resolves the function overload statically, that means it will pick the function that best matches the type of the argument, that's why it calls the char overload.

For example:

char cChar = 'a';

myfunc(cChar);

void myfunc(char a){} //<-- this one is called
void myfunc(int a){}

int iInt = 1;

myfunc(iInt);

void myfunc(char a){} 
void myfunc(int a){} //<-- this one is called

Thanks Charles Bailey. The above code does not apply in this case as X2's my_func hides base class's my_func. This leaves the only solution to qualify the function with the class name.

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Thanx. I thought that my_func is not defined at that point yet and X::my_func should be called. –  big-z Jun 4 '10 at 5:55
    
@zilgo: It isn't defined, but it is declared. And that's all you need. –  GManNickG Jun 4 '10 at 5:57
1  
In a derived class any function with the same name but a different signature will hide the base class functions of the same name. This means that in X2's member functions unqualified my_func always refers to X2::my_func and never to X::my_func. There is no "best match" going on here. The posted "For example:" is misleading as it simply doesn't apply in this case. –  Charles Bailey Jun 4 '10 at 7:33
    
@Charles Bailey. Thanks. Corrected. –  Igor Zevaka Jun 4 '10 at 7:51
void my_func( char value ) { my_func(value); }

You're passing the value which is char so it resolves to calling the same method with accepts a char parameter. It becomes an endless loop.

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void my_func( char value ) { my_func(value); }

right there, you've written a recursive function with no base case. I don't know too much about C++, but you need to somehow specify that you want to call X's my_func, not X2's(I'm assuming that's what you want to do.)

edit: To fix it, you need to cast value to an int

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2  
A cast to int of the parameter isn't going to help. my_func in the derived class hides the base class my_func. An explicit qualification of my_func is needed. –  Charles Bailey Jun 4 '10 at 7:34
    
Doesn't it overload it, not hide it? –  Bwmat Jun 4 '10 at 18:49

The program gets in an infinite loop. my_func() calls itself and there's no condition to exit out of it.

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Your call my_func(value) is recursive. Did you mean super::my_func(value) ?

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You need to explicitly call the base class' function, i.e.:

struct X
{
  void my_func( int ) { std::cout << "Converted to int" << std::endl; }
};

struct X2 : X
{
  void my_func( char value ) { X:my_func(value); }
};

By default, the compiler uses functions within the same class if present, as there is no way for it to know which one you actually want to use. By specifying BaseClass::Function within a derived class' method, the compiler will explicitly create a call to that base class's method, even if you have overridden.

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