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I have a databases table with ~50K rows in it, each row represents a job that need to be done. I have a program that extracts a job from the DB, does the job and puts the result back in the db. (this system is running right now)

Now I want to allow more than one processing task to do jobs but be sure that no task is done twice (as a performance concern not that this will cause other problems). Because the access is by way of a sproce, my current though is to replace said sproce with something that looks something like this

update tbl set owner=connection_id() where avalable and owner is null limit 1;
select stuff from tbl where owner = connection_id();

BTW; worker's tasks might drop there connection between getting a job and submitting the results. Also, I don't expect the DB to even come close to being the bottle neck unless I mess that part up (~5 jobs per minute)

Are there any issues with this? Is there a better way to do this?

Note: the "Database as an IPC anti-pattern" is only slightly apropos here because 1) I'm not doing IPC (there is no process generating the rows, they all already exist right now) and 2) the primary gripe described for that anti-pattern is that it results in unneeded load on the DB as processes wait for messages (in my case, if there are no messages, everything can shutdown as everything is done)

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Right - bad = synchronous IPC with blocking on a dbms SELECT as a read. You're presumably doing this as a strategy for introducing asynchronicity. –  dkretz Nov 18 '08 at 0:21
    
BTW, if you want to put the reader(s) on a timer, it's useful to have them check infrequently, but if they find work, they can drain the queue before sleeping again. –  dkretz Nov 18 '08 at 0:23
    
Note my edit: if they find no work, they will never find work. But if that were not true... –  BCS Nov 18 '08 at 0:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here's what I've used successfully in the past:

MsgQueue table schema

MsgId identity -- NOT NULL
MsgTypeCode varchar(20) -- NOT NULL  
SourceCode varchar(20)  -- process inserting the message -- NULLable  
State char(1) -- 'N'ew if queued, 'A'(ctive) if processing, 'C'ompleted, default 'N' -- NOT NULL 
CreateTime datetime -- default GETDATE() -- NOT NULL  
Msg varchar(255) -- NULLable  

Your message types are what you'd expect - messages that conform to a contract between the process(es) inserting and the process(es) reading, structured with XML or your other choice of representation (JSON would be handy in some cases, for instance).

Then 0-to-n processes can be inserting, and 0-to-n processes can be reading and processing the messages, Each reading process typically handles a single message type. Multiple instances of a process type can be running for load-balancing.

The reader pulls one message and changes the state to "A"ctive while it works on it. When it's done it changes the state to "C"omplete. It can delete the message or not depending on whether you want to keep the audit trail. Messages of State = 'N' are pulled in MsgType/Timestamp order, so there's an index on MsgType + State + CreateTime.

Variations:
State for "E"rror.
Column for Reader process code.
Timestamps for state transitions.

This has provided a nice, scalable, visible, simple mechanism for doing a number of things like you are describing. If you have a basic understanding of databases, it's pretty foolproof and extensible.


Code from comments:

CREATE PROCEDURE GetMessage @MsgType VARCHAR(8) ) 
AS 
DECLARE @MsgId INT 

BEGIN TRAN 

SELECT TOP 1 @MsgId = MsgId 
FROM MsgQueue 
WHERE MessageType = @pMessageType AND State = 'N' 
ORDER BY CreateTime


IF @MsgId IS NOT NULL 
BEGIN 

UPDATE MsgQueue 
SET State = 'A' 
WHERE MsgId = @MsgId 

SELECT MsgId, Msg 
FROM MsgQueue 
WHERE MsgId = @MsgId  
END 
ELSE 
BEGIN 
SELECT MsgId = NULL, Msg = NULL 
END 

COMMIT TRAN
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The part described as "The reader pulls one message and changes the state to "A"ctive while it works on it." is the part I'm interested in. How do you do that bit? (aside from that, it looks like mine is the same as yours with out the stuff that isn't needed for my case.) –  BCS Nov 18 '08 at 0:19
    
Right, that requires multiple SQL statements between BEGIN TRAN and COMMIT TRAN. Immediately following - an SP for pulling the next message - hacked up a bit, I've omitted error trapping since it was written pre-TRY/CATCH. –  dkretz Nov 18 '08 at 0:50
1  
-- PART 1 CREATE PROCEDURE GetMessage @MsgType VARCHAR(8) ) AS DECLARE @MsgId INT BEGIN TRAN SELECT TOP 1 @MsgId = MsgId FROM MsgQueue WHERE MessageType = @pMessageType AND State = 'N' ORDER BY CreateTime –  dkretz Nov 18 '08 at 0:52
1  
PART 2 IF @MsgId IS NOT NULL BEGIN UPDATE MsgQueue SET State = 'A' WHERE MsgId = @MsgId SELECT MsgId, Msg FROM MsgQueue WHERE MsgId = @MsgId END ELSE BEGIN SELECT MsgId = NULL, Msg = NULL END COMMIT TRAN –  dkretz Nov 18 '08 at 0:54
    
what if i have to select more than(multiple) one row(s) at a time? can i update all at same time? –  Amitd Dec 22 '09 at 6:14

Just as a possible technology change, you might consider using MSMQ or something similar.

Each of your jobs / threads could query the messaging queue to see if a new job was available. Because the act of reading a message removes it from the stack, you are ensured that only one job / thread would get the message.

Of course, this is assuming you are working with a Microsoft platform.

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I have the data in the DB, when I'm done I need the data in the DB. In my case I see no reason to add another component to the system. (BTW microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/technologies/msmq/default.mspx) –  BCS Nov 18 '08 at 0:21

Instead of having owner = null when it isn't owned, you should set it to a fake nobody record instead. Searching for null doesn't limit the index, you might end up with a table scan. (this is for oracle, SQL server might be different)

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You are trying to implement de "Database as IPC" antipattern. Look it up to understand why you should consider redesigning your software properly.

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1  
How do you know it's an antipattern in this case, or that the software design is improper? You don't have any context on which to base this comment whatsoever. –  Greg Beech Nov 17 '08 at 23:08
    
A quick google does not find anything on "Database as IPC" –  Nathan Lee Nov 17 '08 at 23:09
    
I'd called it a useful pattern for asynchronous IPC. You can configure it to operate like any garden-variety message queue, and they aren't in my experience branded "antipatterns". –  dkretz Nov 17 '08 at 23:45
1  
Here's a reference to the antipattern - tripatlas.com/Database_as_an_IPC The difference is that we're discussing using the database as a message queue, not as a mechanism for processes to interoperate. –  dkretz Nov 18 '08 at 0:04
2  
Using a database as a message queue is an anti-pattern. You're going to get lock contention up the ying-yang, and if you're using an MVCC system with multiple workers you're going to end up with nebulous state for any record. You should use a message queue broker like RabbitMQ. –  jasonjwwilliams Nov 9 '11 at 0:45

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