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I'd like to know if there is a way to throw an exception from inside a method, but to not include that method in the exception stack trace. E.g.

void ThrowSomeException()
{
    throw new SomeException();
}

And then, if I call that method from a method called Foo() I want the exception stack trace to start with at Foo(), not at ThrowSomeException(). I assume if this was possible it might be through the use of attributes on the method.

I'm interested in the general answer, but in case this isn't possible, what I'm really trying to do is create an extension method AssertEqual() for IEnumerable that I'll use in NUnit tests. So when I call myEnumerable.AssertEqual(otherEnumerable) and it fails, NUnit should report the error inside the test method, not inside the extension method.

Thanks!

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2  
Have you looked at the CollectionAssert helpers? NUnit 2.4+; it sounds like you're after AreEqual or AreEquivalent. – alastairs Jun 4 '10 at 10:45
    
Ah thank you -- I'm new to NUnit. I'm still interested in the answer to the first question though, if anyone knows. – gordonmleigh Jun 4 '10 at 10:58
4  
+1 because you asked a kind of crazy question but explained why. I can not tell you how much it bugs me to see a crazy question and wonder why anyone would ever want what was being asked. Good Job! – Tony Jun 4 '10 at 12:38
    
@stakx what an entirely pointless set of edits to make over two years after the original post. – gordonmleigh Aug 15 '12 at 15:21
1  
@gordonml: I'm sorry you think it pointless, but that doesn't make it so. Your question might be solved, but other people will still visit this page. My edit is mostly for these people and fixes two things: 1. One can hardly call a method a function, esp. when it doesn't return a value and when its sole purpose is to have side effects. 2. throw Exception() was syntactically incorrect, and even if it were correct, it would be a bad idea. it is generally not recommended to throw instances of Exception (only of more specific exception types). – stakx Aug 15 '12 at 15:52
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Maybe you could derive your own exception type and override the StackTrace property getter to exclude your method:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class MyException : Exception {

    string _excludeFromStackTrace;

    public MyException(string excludeFromStackTrace) {
        _excludeFromStackTrace = excludeFromStackTrace;
    }

    public override string StackTrace {
        get {
            List<string> stackTrace = new List<string>();
            stackTrace.AddRange(base.StackTrace.Split(new string[] {Environment.NewLine},StringSplitOptions.None));
            stackTrace.RemoveAll(x => x.Contains(_excludeFromStackTrace));
            return string.Join(Environment.NewLine, stackTrace.ToArray());
        }
    }
}

class Program {

    static void TestExc() {
        throw new MyException("Program.TestExc");
    }

    static void foo() {
        TestExc();
    }

    static void Main(params string[] args) {
        try{
            foo();
        } catch (Exception exc){
            Console.WriteLine(exc.StackTrace);
        }
    }

}
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1  
Hmm seems a little bit clumsy but my feeling is now that this might be the only way to do it, so I'll mark it as the answer, thank you. – gordonmleigh Jun 4 '10 at 17:59
1  
Alternative approach to the stack trace string/array fiddling: Make use of the System.Diagnostics.StackTrace class instead: new StackTrace(someException, skipFrames: …).ToString(). (However, be aware that StackTrace.ToString() doesn't by default emit file names and line numbers, so one would have to derive these from the StackFrame objects that can be derived from a StackTrace.) – stakx Aug 10 '12 at 8:33

Using the code at the end of this answer allows you to write code such as:

[HideFromStackTrace] // apply this to all methods you want omitted in stack traces
static void ThrowIfNull(object arg, string paramName)
{
    if (arg == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(paramName);
}

static void Foo(object something)
{
    ThrowIfNull(something, paramName: "something");
    …
}

static void Main()
{
    try
    {
        Foo(null);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(e.GetStackTraceWithoutHiddenMethods());
    }                  // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
}                      // gets a stack trace string representation
                       // that excludes all marked methods

Here's one possible implementation:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method, Inherited=false)]
public class HideFromStackTraceAttribute : Attribute { }

public static class MethodBaseExtensions
{
    public static bool ShouldHideFromStackTrace(this MethodBase method)
    {
        return method.IsDefined(typeof(HideFromStackTraceAttribute), true);
    }
}

public static class ExceptionExtensions
{
    public static string GetStackTraceWithoutHiddenMethods(this Exception e)
    {
        return string.Concat(
            new StackTrace(e, true)
                .GetFrames()
                .Where(frame => !frame.GetMethod().ShouldHideFromStackTrace())
                .Select(frame => new StackTrace(frame).ToString())
                .ToArray());  // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^     ^
    }                         // required because you want the usual stack trace
}                             // formatting; StackFrame.ToString() formats differently

Note that this only causes marked methods to be excluded from one particular representation of the stack trace, not from the stack trace itself. I know of no way to achieve the latter.

P.S.: If all you want is to hide a method in the Call Stack window during a debugging session, simply apply the [DebuggerHidden] attribute to the method.

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1  
Best solution so far. And Expandable because you can add additional data to the attributes and enable a expanded formatting. Also you can define some precompiler conditions in the attribute to support different debug modes or do it with a static class. ( Release, Customer_Test, Test, Test_Full, ... ). – Felix K. Oct 8 '12 at 8:45
    
I voted for Paolo's solution (since it can be used in cases where you can't modify code with a new attribute), but this is still a cool solution too! – kornman00 Oct 26 '15 at 16:47

I am guessing that you want to do this in order to consolidate code that is used to create the exception? In that case, rather than write a ThrowException() function, why not write a GetException() function? Then in Foo, just do throw GetException();

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1  
Not entirely true in this specific case, but good idea otherwise, thanks – gordonmleigh Jun 4 '10 at 17:57
    
Isn't working when wanting something like if (Disposed) throw new ObjectDisposedException(). – Felix K. Oct 8 '12 at 8:38

Please note that this is improvement to the existing answers.

The Accepted answer of this question is really clumsy because

  1. It determine the method that we need to hide from stack trace by its name using pure string.

  2. Splitting the stack trace is based on the string.Split method.

  3. It hide just one method from StackTrace property, No more.

But it override StackTrace property itself (which the desired behavior of the question)

the second solution is really more clean because

  1. it is using attribute instead of specifying the name of the method as string.

  2. It could be used to hide more than one method from the StackTrace.

but it really complicated and adding two more classes just for extension methods. And the most important weakpoint in it is not overriding the StackTrace property itself.

After reading the previous two solutions, I think I reached to the simplest AND most clean way (which combine the best of the two top answer of this question)

here is the infrastructure that needed.

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method, Inherited = false)]
public sealed class StackTraceHiddenAttribute : Attribute
{
}

public class SomeException : Exception
{
    public override string StackTrace
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Concat(
                new StackTrace(this, true)
                    .GetFrames()
                    .Where(frame => !frame.GetMethod().IsDefined(typeof(StackTraceHiddenAttribute), true))
                    .Select(frame => new StackTrace(frame).ToString())
                    .ToArray());
        }
    }
}

and here is an example of using the previous infrastructure

[StackTraceHidden] // apply this to all methods you want omitted in stack traces
static void Throw()
{
    throw new SomeException();
}

static void Foo()
{
    Throw();
}

static void Main()
{
    try
    {
        Foo();
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(e.StackTrace);
    }                  
}      
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