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I'm preferably looking for a PL/SQL query to accomplish this, but other options might be useful too.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted
SELECT LAST_DDL_TIME, TIMESTAMP
FROM USER_OBJECTS
WHERE OBJECT_TYPE = 'PROCEDURE'
AND OBJECT_NAME = 'MY_PROC';

LAST_DDL_TIME is the last time it was compiled. TIMESTAMP is the last time it was changed.

Procedures may need to be recompiled even if they have not changed when a dependency changes.

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1  
i cannot find user_objects. Error is occuring while running this query –  VeeKayBee Dec 9 '10 at 4:40
1  
@Harie - that's because this question is about Oracle, not SQL Server. –  ninesided Nov 3 '11 at 9:52
    
Does the description of LAST_DDL_TIME and TIMESTAMP holds ? I just re-compiled a package body (it was invalid): alter package foo compile body reuse settings; and both columns where updated. Other difference is that I query DBA_OBJECTS (but that shouldn't matter ?). –  user272735 Aug 23 '12 at 6:33
    
@user272735 Which version of Oracle are you on? I think they enhanced some dependency related stuff in 11 which might have changed this. –  WW. Aug 23 '12 at 11:29
    
I tried on both 10.2 and 11.2 with identical results. –  user272735 Aug 24 '12 at 3:39

Following query will do in Oracle

 SELECT * FROM ALL_OBJECTS WHERE OBJECT_NAME = 'OBJ_NAME' ;
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4  
@Thilakan - If you are going to query ALL_OBJECTS you should include a predicate on OWNER otherwise you may get multiple rows in addition to the OBJECT_TYPE predicate from WW's answer a couple years ago. You should probably also note that ALL_OBJECTS contains all the objects the current user has privileges on not all objects in the database which would be in DBA_OBJECTS. –  Justin Cave Nov 15 '11 at 5:01
SELECT name, create_date, modify_date 
FROM sys.procedures order by modify_date desc
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2  
That will not work for Oracle. –  a_horse_with_no_name Nov 3 '11 at 7:47
    
That's sql server –  Rob Sedgwick Dec 4 '14 at 12:06

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