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Would it make sense to perform git rebase while preserving the commit timestamps?

I believe a consequence would be that the new branch will not necessarily have commit dates chronologically. Is that theoretically possible at all? (e.g. using plumbing commands; just curious here)

If it is theoretically possible, then is it possible in practice with rebase, not to change the timestamps?

For example, assume I have the following tree:

master <jun 2010>
  |
  :
  :
  :     oldbranch <feb 1984>
  :     /
oldcommit <jan 1984>

Now, if I rebase oldbranch on master, the date of the commit changes from feb 1984 to jun 2010. Is it possible to change that behaviour so that the commit timestamp is not changed? In the end I would thus obtain:

      oldbranch <feb 1984>
      /
 master <jun 2010>
    |
    :

Would that make sense at all? Is it even allowed in git to have a history where an old commit has a more recent commit as a parent?

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2  
It's funky that the answer to the question is indeed "you don't need to do anything - that's how it works be default". But now suppose you want commit to be sorted in proper date order while doing rebase (which is pretty natural scenario if you think about it). Now, I wasn't able to find how to achieve that, and posted my q as stackoverflow.com/questions/12270357/really-flatten-a-git-merge –  pfalcon Sep 4 '12 at 19:51
1  
David mentions another option to reset committer date: git rebase --committer-date-is-author-date SHA. See my edited answer below –  VonC Jun 17 at 13:59

4 Answers 4

If you've already screwed up the commit dates (perhaps with a rebase) and want to reset them to their corresponding author dates, you can run:

git filter-branch --env-filter 'GIT_COMMITTER_DATE=$GIT_AUTHOR_DATE; export GIT_COMMITTER_DATE'

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3  
This required that I use --env-filter 'GIT_COMMITTER_DATE=$GIT_AUTHOR_DATE; export GIT_COMMITTER_DATE' instead. Otherwise, the command would fail with a "bad variable" message. (But thanks regardless!) –  Daniel Werner Oct 2 '12 at 7:58
1  
I just tried this, but no effect. I got the folowing output: WARNING: Ref 'refs/heads/master' is unchanged. I am using git version 1.7.9.5 on Linux (64 bit) –  Markus N. Nov 9 '13 at 11:39
1  
I'd like to add another approach if you've already screwed up but don't want to iterate through the whole history: git rebase --committer-date-is-author-date <base_branch> This way, git will reset the commit date only for the commits applied upon <base_branch> (which is probably the same branch name you used when you screwed up). –  speakman Jun 17 at 10:05

Update June 2014: David Fraser mentions in the comments a solution also detailed in "Change timestamps while rebasing git branch", using the option --committer-date-is-author-date (introduced initially in Jan. 2009 in commit 3f01ad6

Note that the --committer-date-is-author-date option seems to leave the author timestamp, and set the committer timestamp to be the same as the original author timestamp, which is what the OP Olivier Verdier wanted.

I found the last commit with the correct date and did:

git rebase --committer-date-is-author-date SHA

See git am:

--committer-date-is-author-date

By default the command records the date from the e-mail message as the commit author date, and uses the time of commit creation as the committer date.
This allows the user to lie about the committer date by using the same value as the author date.


(Original answer, June 2012)

You could try, for a non-interactive rebase

git rebase --ignore-date

(from this SO answer)

This is passed to git am, which mentions:

 --ignore-date

By default the command records the date from the e-mail message as the commit author date, and uses the time of commit creation as the committer date.
This allows the user to lie about the author date by using the same value as the committer date.

For git rebase, this option is "Incompatible with the --interactive option."

Since you can change at will the timestamp of old commit date (with git filter-branch), I suppose you can organize your Git history with whatever commit date order you want/need, even set it to the future!.


As Olivier mentions in his question, the author date is never changed by a rebase;
From the Pro Git Book:

  • The author is the person who originally wrote the work,
  • whereas the committer is the person who last applied the work.

So, if you send in a patch to a project and one of the core members applies the patch, both of you get credit.

To be extra clear, in this instance, as Olivier comments:

the --ignore-date does the opposite of what I was trying to achieve!
Namely, it erases the author's timestamp and replace them with the commits timestamps!
So the right answer to my question is:
Do not do anything, since git rebase does actually not change authors' timestamps by default.


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Interesting about the arbitrary dates to commit. However, git rebase --ignore-date does not work. It changes the dates of the rebased commits. –  Olivier Verdier Jun 4 '10 at 18:21
    
@Olivier: strange: did you made a non-interactive rebase? And between the Author Date and the Committer Date, are we sure to monitor the "right" date? –  VonC Jun 5 '10 at 8:20
1  
Thanks VonC, the difference between author and committer timestamp, that's what makes it all suddenly clear. I wrote the answer to my question in my post, but feel free to adapt your answer to reflect that. –  Olivier Verdier Jun 5 '10 at 8:44
    
@Olivier: good point. I have completed my answer to reflect the difference between the two dates. –  VonC Jun 5 '10 at 10:39
2  
to be more precise: the --ignore-date does the opposite of what I was trying to achieve! Namely, it erases the author's timestamp and replace them with the commits timestamps! So the right answer to my question is: do not do anything, since git rebase does actually not change authors' timestamps by default. –  Olivier Verdier Jun 5 '10 at 11:01
up vote 10 down vote accepted

A crucial question of Von C helped me understand what is going on: when your rebase, the committer's timestamp changes, but not the author's timestamp, which suddenly all makes sense. So my question was actually not precise enough.

The answer is that rebase actually doesn't change the author's timestamps (you don't need to do anything for that), which suits me perfectly.

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By default, git rebase will set the committer's timestamp to the time when the new commit is created, but keep the author's timestamp intact. Most of time, this is the desired behavior, but at some scenarios, we dot not wish to change the commiter's timestamp either. How can we accomplish that? Well, here is the trick I usually do.

First, make sure each of the commits you are about to rebase has a unique commit message(This is where is trick needs improvements, currently it suits my needs though).

Before the rebase, record the commiter's timestamp and commit message of all the commits which will be rebased to a file.

#NOTE: BASE is the commit where your rebase begins
git log --pretty='%ct %s' BASE..HEAD > hashlog

Then,let the actual rebase take place.

Finally, we replace the current committer's timestamp with the one recorded in the file if the commit message is the same by using git filter-branch.

 git filter-branch --env-filter '__date=$(__log=$(git log -1 --pretty="%s" $GIT_COMMIT); grep -m 1 "$__log" ../../hashlog | cut -d" " -f1); test -n "$__date" && export GIT_COMMITTER_DATE=$__date || cat' ")'

If something goes wrong, just checkout git reflog or all the refs/original/ refs.

Furthormore, you can do the similar thing to the author's timestamp.

For example, if the author's timestamp of some commits are out of order, and without rearrange these commits, we just want the author's timestamp to show in order, then the following commands will help.

git log --pretty='%at %s' COMMIT1..COMMIT2 > hashlog
join -1 1 -2 1 <(cat hashlog | cut -f 1 | sort -nr | awk '{ print NR" "$1 }') <(cat hashlog | awk '{ print NR" "$0 }') | cut -d" " -f2,4- > hashlog_
mv hashlog_ hashlog
git filter-branch --env-filter '__date=$(__log=$(git log -1 --pretty="%s" $GIT_COMMIT); grep -m 1 "$__log" ../../hashlog | cut -d" " -f1); test -n "$__date" && export GIT_AUTHOR_DATE=$__date || cat' ")'
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