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Only part of the string is getting decrypted, i think it has to do with my encoding.

Here is what happens:

        string s = "The brown fox jumped over the green frog";
        string k = "urieurut";
        string enc = EncryptString(s, k);
        string dec = DecryptString(enc, k);

The RESULT is this: The brown fox juϼ㴘裴혽Ή⪻ㆉr th≸ g⟤een frog

public static string EncryptString(string stringToEncrypt, string encryptionKey)
{
    string encrypted = String.Empty;

    UnicodeEncoding UE = new UnicodeEncoding();
    byte[] key = UE.GetBytes(encryptionKey);

    RijndaelManaged RMCrypto = new RijndaelManaged();
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, RMCrypto.CreateEncryptor(key, key), CryptoStreamMode.Write);

    byte[] encryptedString = UE.GetBytes(stringToEncrypt);
    cs.Write(encryptedString, 0, encryptedString.Length);
    cs.FlushFinalBlock();
    cs.Close();

    encrypted = UE.GetString(ms.ToArray());
    return encrypted;
}

public static string DecryptString(string stringToDecrypt, string encryptionKey)
{
    string decrypted = String.Empty;

    UnicodeEncoding UE = new UnicodeEncoding();
    byte[] key = UE.GetBytes(encryptionKey);
    byte[] data = UE.GetBytes(stringToDecrypt);

    RijndaelManaged RMCrypto = new RijndaelManaged();
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, RMCrypto.CreateDecryptor(key, key), CryptoStreamMode.Write);
    cs.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
    cs.FlushFinalBlock();
    cs.Close();

    decrypted = UE.GetString(ms.ToArray());

    return decrypted;
}
share|improve this question
    
Wow cool... I see broken Korean in the result... –  code4life Jun 4 '10 at 21:51
    
Yea i started to wonder if North Korea was bustin my stuff. –  schmoopy Jun 7 '10 at 13:20

3 Answers 3

Here you go:

    string s = "The brown fox jumped over the green frog";
    string k = "urieurut";
    byte[] enc = EncryptString(s, k);
    string dec = DecryptString(enc, k);

You can't attempt to interpret an encrypted bunch of bytes as a Unicode string. Keep them as bytes. The decrypted version can be converted back to string.

Also note the disposing of disposable objects below. You could wind up with some resources being held too long or leak if you don't release them properly with using() or Dispose().

public static byte[] EncryptString(string stringToEncrypt, string encryptionKey)
{
    UnicodeEncoding UE = new UnicodeEncoding();
    byte[] key = UE.GetBytes(encryptionKey);

    using (RijndaelManaged RMCrypto = new RijndaelManaged())
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    using (ICryptoTransform encryptor = RMCrypto.CreateEncryptor(key, key))
    using (CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
    {
        byte[] encryptedString = UE.GetBytes(stringToEncrypt);
        cs.Write(encryptedString, 0, encryptedString.Length);
        cs.FlushFinalBlock();
        return ms.ToArray();
    }
}

public static string DecryptString(byte[] stringToDecrypt, string encryptionKey)
{
    UnicodeEncoding UE = new UnicodeEncoding();
    byte[] key = UE.GetBytes(encryptionKey);

    using (RijndaelManaged RMCrypto = new RijndaelManaged())
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    using (ICryptoTransform decryptor = RMCrypto.CreateDecryptor(key, key))
    using (CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, decryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
    {
        cs.Write(stringToDecrypt, 0, stringToDecrypt.Length);
        cs.FlushFinalBlock();
        return UE.GetString(ms.ToArray());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Or base64 encode it if you need a string. (Looks like that's what the OP ended up doing...) –  GalacticCowboy Jun 4 '10 at 16:41
    
Yes i am disposing of (most of) the objects, i just used the sample for clarity - but i had missed disposing of one which i would not have caught had you of not pointed it out - thank you. –  schmoopy Jun 7 '10 at 13:20
    
Curious - why did someone downvote this? A comment would be welcome. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 14 '10 at 13:27
    
Well i upvoted ya to offset it. –  schmoopy Jun 21 '10 at 15:19
    
I did the same for yours :) –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 21 '10 at 21:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I solved my issue by using base64 string for the encryption - i may look at other options but i only needed these methods for a small amount of data, here is the final code:

public static string EncryptString(string stringToEncrypt, string encryptionKey)
{
    string encrypted = String.Empty;
    byte[] key = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(encryptionKey);

    RijndaelManaged RMCrypto = new RijndaelManaged();
    RMCrypto.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, RMCrypto.CreateEncryptor(key, key), CryptoStreamMode.Write);

    byte[] encryptedString = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(stringToEncrypt);
    cs.Write(encryptedString, 0, encryptedString.Length);
    cs.FlushFinalBlock();
    cs.Close();

    //encrypted = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(ms.ToArray());
    return Convert.ToBase64String(ms.ToArray());
}

public static string DecryptString(string stringToDecrypt, string encryptionKey)
{
    string decrypted = String.Empty;
    byte[] key = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(encryptionKey);
    byte[] data = Convert.FromBase64String(stringToDecrypt);

    RijndaelManaged RMCrypto = new RijndaelManaged();
    RMCrypto.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    CryptoStream cs = new CryptoStream(ms, RMCrypto.CreateDecryptor(key, key), CryptoStreamMode.Write);
    cs.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
    cs.FlushFinalBlock();
    cs.Close();

    decrypted = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(ms.ToArray());

    return decrypted;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that byte[] key = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(encryptionKey); will use at most 6 chars from the password to form a pretty weak key. Using ASCII or UTF8 would already be a big improvement, to do it right see the Rfc2898DeriveBytes class. –  Henk Holterman Jun 5 '10 at 7:26
    
@Henk, could you explain the 'why' behind that it uses at most 6 chars when getting the unicode chars from a unicode string? –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 6 '10 at 18:43
    
Wow. I never knew the first 16 bytes were length. Thanks for the information. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 7 '10 at 22:37
    
Just a correction here: UniCode.GetBytes() does not use a length-prefix, my error. But a 8 char password will give a 16 byte key in which half the bytes are 00. Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/3013368 –  Henk Holterman Jun 10 '10 at 10:27
    
Huh, someone voted this one down too without explanation. Awesome. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 14 '10 at 13:28

Not sure about your specific code chunk, but Jeff Atwood did a nice little library that I've used before:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/security/SimpleEncryption.aspx

It's worth a look as it simplifies the process of encrypting things a lot, I actually had to port to C# as there wasn't a port available when I saw it. However there is now a C# port (in the comments section).

share|improve this answer
    
I will take a look at that, i like the different options there - thank you. –  schmoopy Jun 4 '10 at 15:44
    
Cool, sorry I couldn't help directly. –  Adam Houldsworth Jun 4 '10 at 15:48

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