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How to generate changelog of commits groupped by date, in format:

[date today]
- commit message1
- commit message2
- commit message3
...
[date day+3]
- commit message1
- commit message2
- commit message3
...
(skip this day if no commits)

[date day+1]
- commit message1
- commit message2
- commit message3
... 
[date since]
- commit message1
- commit message2
- commit message3

Any git log command, or smart bash script?

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1  
What if commitdate is non-monotonic, due to clock skew / misconfigured clock for one of contributors? –  Jakub Narębski Jun 5 '10 at 12:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Here is dirty, but working version of the script I came up with:

#!/bin/bash
# Generates changelog day by day
NEXT=$(date +%F)
echo "CHANGELOG"
echo ----------------------
git log --no-merges --format="%cd" --date=short | sort -u -r | while read DATE ; do
    echo
    echo [$DATE]
    GIT_PAGER=cat git log --no-merges --format=" * %s" --since=$DATE --until=$NEXT
    NEXT=$DATE
done
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1  
Just use a pipe into the loop: produce-and-sort-dates | while read DATE; do …; done. Incidentally, you might want GIT_PAGER=cat git log … for the second one (to prevent git log from using a pager when the whole script’s output is going to a terminal). Also, you probably want to be consistent with --no-merges, otherwise you might get [date] headers without any commits if all the commits for a day were merges. –  Chris Johnsen Jun 5 '10 at 20:36
    
Thank you Chris. I have updated the code. (Previously I was trying to add the pipe at the end of the loop) –  takeshin Jun 5 '10 at 21:19
    
I dig it. Thanks. –  Mauvis Ledford Jan 9 '12 at 23:08

I couldn't get the accepted answer to handle today's commits as my setup didn't handle the NEXT variable properly on the first iteration. Git's log parameters will accept a time too, which removes the need for a NEXT date:

#!/bin/bash
# Generates changelog day by day
echo "CHANGELOG"
echo ----------------------
git log --no-merges --format="%cd" --date=short | sort -u -r | while read DATE ; do
    echo
    echo [$DATE]
    GIT_PAGER=cat git log --no-merges --format=" * %s" --since="$DATE 00:00:00" --until="$DATE 24:00:00"
done
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git log has --since and --until, it shouldn't be hard to wrap some stuff around that.

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That would require most certainly some kind of script.
A bit like this commandline-fu

for k in `git branch|perl -pe s/^..//`;do echo -e `git show --pretty=format:"%Cgreen%ci %Cblue%cr%Creset" $k|head -n 1`\\t$k;done|sort -r

(not exactly what you are after but can gives you an idea nonetheless)

I know about GitStats which has also data organized by date (but not the commit messages)


Note: the git branch part of this command is ill-fitted for scripting, as Jakub Narębski comments.
git for-each-ref or git show-ref are natural candidate for scripting commands, being plumbing commands.

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Thanks for this informative answer. One more thing which I need to know: How to list all the commits for the specific, single day: git log --since="2010-06-02" --until="2010-06-02" list nothing. –  takeshin Jun 4 '10 at 19:32
    
@takeshin: did you try git log --since="2010-06-02" --until="2010-06-03" ? (from one day - 02 - to another - 03 -) –  VonC Jun 4 '10 at 19:38
    
@VonC, yeah, but in the simple loop I know only the date, not the next date. –  takeshin Jun 4 '10 at 19:40
    
@VonC, My plan is: to generate unique list of dates: git log --pretty="format: %ad" --date=short | uniq and iterate them in the loop, similar to this from your answer. –  takeshin Jun 4 '10 at 19:43
1  
Don't use git branch output for scripting; it is user-interface command, and its output can change. Use git show-ref or git for-each-ref which are intended for scripting. –  Jakub Narębski Jun 5 '10 at 12:32

I wrote a script in python to create a week-by-week git log.

You could easily change it to days, months, etc by changing the timedelta

https://gist.github.com/NahimNasser/4772132

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