Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had created an Oracle PL/SQL package with a header and a body with lots of code. Later, I ended up accidentally erasing the code from that body after reran the CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE BODY... statement with different source code (which actually I intended to save under a different package name). Is there anyway I can recover my older replaced source code from the packege?

share|improve this question
3  
What about CVS/etc? –  OMG Ponies Jun 4 '10 at 18:20

2 Answers 2

You might be able to get it back by using a flashback query on all_source.

e.g. my package body is currently at version 2, executing this query as a standard user:

SQL> select text
  2  from all_source
  3  where name = 'CARPENTERI_TEST'
  4  and type = 'PACKAGE BODY';

TEXT


package body carpenteri_test
is

procedure do_stuff
is
begin
   dbms_output.put_line('version 2');
end do_stuff;

end carpenteri_test;

10 rows selected.

I know I changed this around 9:30 this evening so after connecting as a SYSDBA user I ran this query:

SQL> select text
  2  from all_source
  3  as of timestamp
  4  to_timestamp('04-JUN-2010 21:30:00', 'DD-MON-YYYY HH24:MI:SS')
  5  where name = 'CARPENTERI_TEST'
  6  and type = 'PACKAGE BODY';

TEXT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

package body carpenteri_test
is

procedure do_stuff
is
begin
   dbms_output.put_line('version 1');
end do_stuff;

end carpenteri_test;

10 rows selected.

More information on flashback can be found here. Tom Kyte also demostrates how to use flashback with all_source here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I tried the first one (w/o the timestamp) and it gave me the latest code. Then I added the timestamp and got "insufficient privileges" error. Will forward it to the dba who can maybe do it for me. –  VVP Jun 4 '10 at 23:13
    
The DBA says that "all_source is not usable with flashback". –  VVP Jun 7 '10 at 18:39
    
point your DBA to this link from Tom Kyte: asktom.oracle.com/pls/asktom/… –  Ian Carpenter Jun 7 '10 at 18:51
    
Thanks, it seems to have worked - you made my day :) –  VVP Jun 7 '10 at 21:15
    
Glad I could help. I've amended my answer to make it clear that you need to connect to as sys and included the link to Tom Kyte's example. –  Ian Carpenter Jun 8 '10 at 7:03

Unless you have logging/auditing of DDL commands enabled, or a backup of the database, then the answer is almost certainly not

Database definitions, including stored procedures, should always be treated like source code, and maintained in a code repository

share|improve this answer
3  
Source control is a must on any and all code, including DB stuff. Small incremental changes and frequent check-ins is key to smooth software development for sure. –  Brian T Hannan Jun 4 '10 at 21:10
    
Thanks for your comments - unfortunately I learnt this the hard way. Actually I almost got around to saving a hard copy of the code using the "Export DDL" option in SQL Developer when I had finished - but something came up and I lost track of it. Anyway - this episode ensures I will not forget it again. –  VVP Jun 4 '10 at 23:14
    
It's happened to us all. There are only 2 types of people: those who do backups/use source control, and those who have never had a data loss –  Mark Baker Jun 5 '10 at 7:54
1  
Source control comments aside, the answer is to use flashback as described by @carpenteri –  Nick Pierpoint Jun 5 '10 at 23:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.