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In particular, the display of initialization lists is really bad:

vector<int> v({1,2,3});

will highlight the curly braces in red (denoting an error).

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2  
(denoting and error). english stack exchange. –  deft_code Jan 28 '12 at 6:39
    
@deft_code: you're right. –  Neil G Jan 28 '12 at 6:59
9  
He's right (but was it necessary?) . –  Andres Riofrio Dec 9 '12 at 2:22
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6 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

There is now a C++11 script from http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=3797, which no longer mark the braces inside parenthesis as error.

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Here's the version of that script on github: github.com/vim-scripts/Cpp11-Syntax-Support –  Justin L. Oct 28 '13 at 20:57
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As an alternative, you can use

let c_no_curly_error=1

in your .vimrc file so that vim doesn't tag {} as error in ().

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Very good answer for me! –  Benoit Feb 25 '11 at 12:48
    
Thank you very much fo answer! –  Denis Shevchenko Apr 8 '11 at 8:14
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If you use Syntastic, add this to your .vimrc (or .vimrc.local).

let g:syntastic_cpp_compiler_options = ' -std=c++11'

Syntastic shows errors for code written in multiple languages. Each language has a "checker" which is a wrapper to execute an external program. The external program for the c++ checker is g++. The c++ checker can pass compiler options to g++ and can be configured according to the documentation in the code.

https://github.com/scrooloose/syntastic/blob/master/syntax_checkers/cpp.vim

If you want to use clang++, you can use these options

let g:syntastic_cpp_compiler = 'clang++'
let g:syntastic_cpp_compiler_options = ' -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++'
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1  
Please use the actual clang versioning scheme to denote clang versions, not what apple does with it. –  Cubic May 19 '13 at 23:11
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use uniform initialization instead of the old () constructor

vector v {1,2,3};

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didn't know about this, thanks. –  Neil G May 1 '11 at 20:12
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As far as I know, there is a work in progress for that, see here at the vim_dev mail list.

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An improved patch for C++11 support has been sent to the mailing list: https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!topic/vim_dev/ug_wmWQqyGU

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Thanks for the update. Do you know if any distros picked it up? Or isn't it in upstream Vim yet? –  sehe Sep 19 '13 at 9:42
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