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I am trying to use width and precision specifiers with boost::format, like this:

#include <boost\format.hpp>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    int n = 5;
    std::string s = (boost::format("%*.*s") % (n*2) % (n*2) % "Hello").str();
    return 0;
}

But this doesn't work because boost::format doesn't support the * specifier. Boost throws an exception when parsing the string.

Is there a way to accomplish the same goal, preferably using a drop-in replacement?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try this:

#include <boost/format.hpp>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

int main()
{
    int n = 5;
    string s = (format("%s") % io::group(setw(n*2), setprecision(n*2), "Hello")).str();
    return 0;
}

group() lets you encapsulate one or more io manipulators with a parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I went with, but I'm trying to do this another way, too. See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2981724/… – John Dibling Jun 5 '10 at 19:22
1  
BTW thanks for pointing me to group – John Dibling Jun 5 '10 at 19:24
    
When applied to strings, setprecision is ignored in format, just as it is during ordinary stream I/O. – Rob Kennedy Jan 14 '12 at 21:44
    
Geez, the whole point of using Boost.Format is to avoid that nasty manipulator stuff. +1 anyway for a solution. – Emile Cormier Dec 16 '15 at 3:17

Well, this isn't a drop-in, but one way to do it would be to construct the format string dynamically:

#include <boost/format.hpp>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>

int main()
{
    int n = 5;
    const std::string f("%" + 
                        boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(n * 2) + "." +
                        boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(n * 2) + "s");
    std::string s = (boost::format(f) % "Hello").str();
}

Of course, if you did this frequently, you could refactor construction of the format string into a function.

You could also use boost::format() to generate the format string; it's shorter, but potentially less readable, especially for long format strings:

const std::string f = (boost::format("%%%d.%ds") % (n*2) % (n*2)).str();
std::string s = (boost::format(f) % "Hello").str();

(credit to Ferruccio for posting the second idea in the comments)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is so far the best alternative I've been able to come up with. As you may have imagined, I'm refactoring old code. Some of these strings are super complex, and doing it this way would work, but would be very difficult. +1 anyway – John Dibling Jun 4 '10 at 22:09
3  
Why not use boost::format to generate the format string as well? i.e. std::string f = (boost::format("%%%d.%ds") % n*2 % n*2).str(); – Ferruccio Jun 4 '10 at 22:19

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