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I am constantly entertaining ideas for new products lines and, following our successes with F#, I am interested in developing products to improve the F# ecosystem (i.e. not the language itself). What extra functionality would people like to see from F#? I am particularly interested in novel functionality (e.g. related to F# interactive) rather than repeats of existing technologies (e.g. refactoring).

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I think this should be marked as "Community wiki", because there is no single answer that could be accepted. –  Tomas Petricek Jun 4 '10 at 23:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

One idea that I'd really like to see turned into reality is "attaching FSI" to a running process when debugging. It is probably very difficult to implement (especially without modifying F# tools), but it would be a fantastic feature to have. The scenario is following:

  • You're debugging some application and it hits some breakpoint in your code
  • The current state will be (somehow?) loaded in F# interactive so you can enter commands that manipulate variables on the stack and reachable objects on the heap

This would be extremely valuable for debugging - it is a bit similar to the experience you can get in C# when using "Immediate window", but it is much more powerful - you could essentially fix your program at run-time.

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I would like interactive evaluation integrated into Visual Studio .fs file editor.

Instead of sending bits of code to the interactive via ALT+ENTER, a tool-tip would dipslay the evaluated expression. The tool-tip would have a similar feel to the one shown when hovering over variables in debug mode (in C# at least): i.e. no sense of context switching like there currently is when going between FSI and .fs file editor, and ability to navigate deep into a value's properties (e.g. scroll through all elements of a list, and navigate any element's object graph).

Also, there would be automatic dependency evaluation: if I evaluate function x which depends on function y which has changed since the last time it was evaluated (if ever at all), then function y would automatically get re-evaluated. That includes automatic detection of project references and open modules. To that extent, each evaluation could be a new session, caching previous unchanged evaluations for performance gains.

And I'd like to be able to set break-points and jump into debug mode (with Tomas' "attached FSI") if an evaluation trips one.

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Emacs has a command to eval emacs-lisp and send it to the 'minibuffer' status window, it's very nice. –  Paul Nathan Jun 5 '10 at 4:34

It would be interesting to see interactive code analysis tools that could recommend F#-specific improvements to blocks of code. For example:

1) A tool that could suggest re-structurings based on on tail-recursion, computation expressions, or continuations.

2) An interactive computation expression "laboratory."

3) A tool to help in the management of complex pattern matching expressions. For example, finding more efficient paths through the expression, optimizing the order of the tests, or inferring F# pattern matching expressions from examples.

4) A tool to recommend parallelizations of existing F# code.

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