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I got a lot of errors with the message :

"DatabaseError: current transaction is aborted, commands ignored until end of transaction block"

after changed from python-psycopg to python-psycopg2 as Django project's database engine.

The code remains the same, just dont know where those errors are from.

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2  
I'm curious what was your final resolution to this problem? I'm having this same issue, but since my hosting provider doesn't log query errors it's been impossible so far to figure out what is going wrong. –  user27478 Oct 20 '11 at 7:39
2  
I finally tracked my issue down to a bug when using a database table as the cache backend. Django bug: code.djangoproject.com/ticket/11569 StackOverflow discussion: stackoverflow.com/questions/1189541/… –  user27478 Oct 21 '11 at 19:30
    
FYI If you're just using psycopg2 without django, conn.rollback() (where conn is your connection object) will clear the error so you can run other queries –  User Dec 8 '13 at 11:56

12 Answers 12

up vote 73 down vote accepted

This is what postgres does when a query produces an error and you try to run another query without first rolling back the transaction. To fix it, you'll want to figure out where in the code that bad query is being executed. It might be helpful to use the log_statement and log_min_error_statement options in your postgresql server.

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the problem is when I was using python-psycopg, no such errors raised. does psycopg2 implemented a different mechanism talking to postgres? –  jack Jun 5 '10 at 6:28
3  
The method of talking to the server probably doesn't matter, but it's possible that the version you used before somehow defaulted to autocommit mode while the new version does not. The error might still have occurred, but you could more easily have missed it. It's also possible that data type conversion or something else has changed since the old version. Regardless, the best fix is to track down the bad query so you can see what's wrong with it. –  ʇsәɹoɈ Jun 5 '10 at 7:25

To get rid of the error, roll back the last (erroneous) transaction after you've fixed your code:

from django.db import transaction
transaction.rollback()

Or, use try-except:

from django.db import transaction, DatabaseError
try:
    a.save()
except DatabaseError:
    transaction.rollback()

Refer : Django documentation

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3  
This addresses the core issue and lets you recover after a statement that caused the aborted transaction. –  RichVel Dec 15 '12 at 19:17
    
this, combined with try / except. –  tomwolber Apr 24 '13 at 1:24
3  
Why use IntegrityError and not the base class DatabaseError? –  Jonathan Nov 14 '13 at 12:15
    
@Jonathan Makes sense, thanks! –  Anuj Gupta Mar 25 at 19:52
    
For some reason I had to move the rollback outside of the "except" section. I was using .bulk_create() and not .save() –  nu everest Aug 31 at 22:36

This is very strange behavior for me. I'm surprised that no one thought of savepoints. In my code failing query was expected behavior:

@transaction.commit_on_success
def update():
    skipped = 0
    for old_model in OldModel.objects.all():
        try:
            Model.objects.create(
                group_id=old_model.group_uuid,
                file_id=old_model.file_uuid,
            )
        except IntegrityError:
            skipped += 1
    return skipped

I have changed code this way to use savepoints:

@transaction.commit_on_success
def update():
    skipped = 0
    sid = transaction.savepoint()
    for old_model in OldModel.objects.all():
        try:
            Model.objects.create(
                group_id=old_model.group_uuid,
                file_id=old_model.file_uuid,
            )
        except IntegrityError:
            skipped += 1
            transaction.savepoint_rollback(sid)
        else:
            transaction.savepoint_commit(sid)
    return skipped
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I believe @AnujGupta's answer is correct. However the rollback can itself raise an exception which you should catch and handle:

from django.db import transaction, DatabaseError
try:
    a.save()
except DatabaseError:
    try:
        transaction.rollback()
    except transaction.TransactionManagementError:
        # Log or handle otherwise

If you find you're rewriting this code in various save() locations, you can extract-method:

import traceback
def try_rolling_back():
    try:
        transaction.rollback()
        log.warning('rolled back')  # example handling
    except transaction.TransactionManagementError:
        log.exception(traceback.format_exc())  # example handling

Finally, you can prettify it using a decorator that protects methods which use save():

from functools import wraps
def try_rolling_back_on_exception(fn):
    @wraps(fn)
    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
        try:
            return fn(*args, **kwargs)
        except:
            traceback.print_exc()
            try_rolling_back()
    return wrapped

@try_rolling_back_on_exception
def some_saving_method():
    # ...
    model.save()
    # ...

Even if you implement the decorator above, it's still convenient to keep try_rolling_back() as an extracted method in case you need to use it manually for cases where specific handling is required, and the generic decorator handling isn't enough.

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If you get this while in interactive shell and need a quick fix, do this:

from django.db import connection
connection._rollback()

originally seen in this answer

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In response to @priestc and @Sebastian, what if you do something like this?

try:
    conn.commit()
except:
    pass

cursor.execute( sql )
try: 
    return cursor.fetchall()
except: 
    conn.commit()
    return None

I just tried this code and it seems to work, failing silently without having to care about any possible errors, and working when the query is good.

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I just had this error too but it was masking another more relevant error message where the code was trying to store a 125 characters string in a 100 characters column:

DatabaseError: value too long for type character varying(100)

I had to debug through the code for the above message to show up, otherwise it displays

DatabaseError: current transaction is aborted
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3  
How you did that might be useful... –  Anuj Gupta Mar 15 '13 at 15:57

In my experience, these errors happen this way:

try:
    code_that_executes_bad_query()
    # transaction on DB is now bad
except:
    pass

# transaction on db is still bad
code_that_executes_working_query() # raises transaction error

There nothing wrong with the second query, but since the real error was caught, the second query is the one that raises the (much less informative) error.

edit: this only happens if the except clause catches IntegrityError (or any other low level database exception), If you catch something like DoesNotExist this error will not come up, because DoesNotExist does not corrupt the transaction.

The lesson here is don't do try/except/pass.

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I think the pattern priestc mentions is more likely to be the usual cause of this issue when using PostgreSQL.

However I feel there are valid uses for the pattern and I don't think this issue should be a reason to always avoid it. For example:

try:
    profile = user.get_profile()
except ObjectDoesNotExist:
    profile = make_default_profile_for_user(user)

do_something_with_profile(profile)

If you do feel OK with this pattern, but want to avoid explicit transaction handling code all over the place then you might want to look into turning on autocommit mode (PostgreSQL 8.2+): https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/databases/#autocommit-mode

DATABASES['default'] = {
    #.. you usual options...
    'OPTIONS': {
        'autocommit': True,
    }
}

I am unsure if there are important performance considerations (or of any other type).

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I've got the silimar problem. The solution was to migrate db (manage.py syncdb or manage.py schemamigration --auto <table name> if you use south).

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So, I ran into this same issue. The problem I was having here was that my database wasn't properly synced. Simple problems always seem to cause the most angst...

To sync your django db, from within your app directory, within terminal, type:

$ python manage.py syncdb

Edit: Note that if you are using django-south, running the '$ python manage.py migrate' command may also resolve this issue.

Happy coding!

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3  
Upvoted for stating the obvious. I wouldn't give this more than one upvote though because it was probably not the answer sought. –  Jameson Quinn Oct 28 '11 at 11:17
5  
I fixed it a similar way by python manage.py migrate <app>... for all my apps. –  Clayton Feb 18 '12 at 4:11
3  
@Clayton - you don't say, but I assume you're using django-south - the migrate command is not built into django. –  Greg Ball Apr 18 '12 at 3:36
    
@GregBall- That is correct... I am using django-south. Sorry for not specifying. –  Clayton May 1 '12 at 19:24
    
I'm getting this error when doing syncdb - I think it's to do with the order django goes through the tables. –  Stuart Axon May 9 '12 at 15:41

you could disable transaction via "set_isolation_level(0)"

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