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very often in Internet I see links like this:

www.abcde.com/~main/material/hello

and this part ~main/material/hello is grey, if I remove hello I receive access forbidden, can somebody explain, what is this system, and is it possible receive access?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

what do you mean it is grey? the link text on a page? That can be any colour that the page owner wants, but I don't remember seeing a grey link.

What happens if you type www.abcde.com/~main/material/hello directly into the browser's address window?

If you remove "hello" and receive access forbidden it is because there is no public access to www.abcde.com/~main/materia - give up, you will never access that without a password.

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Directory listing is disallowed on www.abcde.com/~main/material/, but you have access to it's content.

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They've configured the web server to only allow access to certain areas. You won't be able to receive access to it.

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Depends on the web server. On Apache this can be done with

Options -Indexes
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sorry, but what does it mean Options -Indexes , where to enter it? – lego69 Jun 5 '10 at 8:01
    
In the Apache config file, or in a .htaccess file in the directory in question. Read the Apache documentation. – Artelius Jun 5 '10 at 8:03

The tilde (~) is *nix convention for a user's home directory. Using it in the URL tells an appropriately-configured web server to look in a directory in the user's home directory for the files to show via the web server.

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