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I have a problem caused by breaking strict pointer aliasing rule. I have a type T that comes from a template and some integral type Int of the same size (as with sizeof). My code essentially does the following:

T x = some_other_t;
if (*reinterpret_cast <Int*> (&x) == 0)
  ...

Because T is some arbitary (other than the size restriction) type that could have a constructor, I cannot make a union of T and Int. (This is allowed only in C++0x only and isn't even supported by GCC yet).

Is there any way I could rewrite the above pseudocode to preserve functionality and avoid breaking strict aliasing rule? Note that this is a template, I cannot control T or value of some_other_t; the assignment and subsequent comparison do happen inside the templated code.

(For the record, the above code started breaking on GCC 4.5 if T contains any bit fields.)

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1  
What are you trying to do? I can't think of many situations where that code is meaningful. It certainly isn't well-specified by the standard. So assuming this hack is actually necessary (which it probably isn't), you might have to just use the appropriate compiler flag to disable strict aliasing. –  jalf Jun 5 '10 at 15:28
    
@jalf: It's a unique container. I mark empty positions with integral 0. However, since T can be anything, including bitwise 0, I need to mark at most one position as "not empty, even though it looks like empty". The comparison is the check for whether x should be marked so or not. –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 15:32
    
I'm unclear how you're solving this problem - how does a reinterpret_cast allow you to ignore the two different reasons for storing 0? –  Stephen Jun 5 '10 at 15:41
1  
@doublep: That's still not entirely clear. Are you essentially trying to test whether x is represented in memory by all zeros? –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 5 '10 at 15:42
    
@Stephen: If two T are not equal with ==, they cannot be bitwise equal, at least for any useful in a container definition of equality. So, there cannot be two bitwise-zero elements in a unique container (if equality is sane). –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 15:53
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
static inline int is_T_0(const T *ob)
{
        int p;
        memcpy(&p, ob, sizeof(int));
        return p == 0;
}

void myfunc(void)
{
    T x = some_other_t;
    if (is_T_0(&x))
        ...

On my system, GCC optimizes away both is_T_0() and memcpy(), resulting in just a few assembly instructions in myfunc().

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According to the other question, this is the way to go. –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 22:01
    
Personally I'd make the usage cleaner (to me) by making is_T_0 take a const T&, but you should check to make sure GCC still optimizes everything away in that case. –  Chris Lutz Jun 5 '10 at 22:17
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Have you heard about boost::optional ?

I must admit I am unclear as to the real problem here... but boost::optional allow to store by value and yet know whether or not the actual memory has been initialized. I also allows in place construction and destruction, so could be a good fit I guess.

EDIT:

I think I finally grasped the problem: you want to be able to allocate a lot of objects, at various points in memory, and you'd like to know whether or not the memory at this point really holds an object or not.

Unfortunately your solution has a huge issue: it's incorrect. If ever T can somehow be represented by a null bit pattern, then you'll think it's unitialized memory.

You will have to resort yourself to add at least one bit of information. It's not much really, after all that's only 3% of growth (33 bits for 4 bytes).

You could for example use some mimick boost::optional but in an array fashion (to avoid the padding loss).

template <class T, size_t N>
class OptionalArray
{
public:


private:
  typedef unsigned char byte;

  byte mIndex[N/8+1];
  byte mData[sizeof(T)*N]; // note: alignment not considered
};

Then it's as simple as that:

template <class T, size_t N>
bool OptionalArray<T,N>::null(size_t const i) const
{
  return mIndex[i/8] & (1 << (i%8));
}

template <class T, size_t N>
T& OptionalArray<T,N>::operator[](size_t const i)
{
  assert(!this->null(i));
  return *reinterpret_cast<T*>(mData[sizeof(T)*i]);
}

note: For simplicity's sake I have not considered the issue of alignment. If you don't know about the subject, read about it before fiddling with memory :)

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With the current setup I'm using 4 bytes per element — i.e. not more than the element size. It's about efficiency: this matters when you have many thousands of elements. –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 16:44
    
"Unfortunately your solution has a huge issue: it's incorrect" — can you elaborate on this? –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 17:23
    
Read the next sentence: say T is an Int and I assign 0 to it, then your test will say: "unitialized" while it is initialized (to 0). Your are basically using a "Magic Value" but without any guarantee that your "Magic Value" is out of the domain of meaningful values. That is why you need at least one more bit to store information. –  Matthieu M. Jun 5 '10 at 17:51
    
How about not making assumptions especially when not needed to answer the question? I certainly have this case covered. It is even somewhere in comments to the questions, though that's not very relevant to the original problem. –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 18:01
    
BTW, ironically, boost::optional generates strict-aliasing warnings as well. –  Emile Cormier Jun 5 '10 at 18:23
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How about this:

Int zero = 0;
T x = some_other_t;
if (std::memcmp(&x, &zero, sizeof(zero)) == 0)

It might not be as efficient, but it should get rid of the warning.


ADDENDUM #1:

Since T is constrained to be the same size as Int, make yourself a dummy bitwise zero value of type T and compare directly against it (instead of casting and comparing agaist Int(0)).

If your program is single-threaded, you could have something like this:

template <typename T>
class Container
{
public:
    void foo(T val)
    {
        if (zero_ == val)
        {
            // Do something
        }
    }

private:
    struct Zero
    {
        Zero() {memset(&val, 0, sizeof(val));}
        bool operator==(const T& rhs) const {return val == rhs;}
        T val;
    };
    static Zero zero_;
};

If it is multi-threaded, you'll want to avoid using a static member zero_, and have each container instance hold it's own zero_ member:

template <typename T>
class MTContainer
{
public:
    MTContainer() {memset(zero_, 0, sizeof(zero_));}

    void foo(T val)
    {
        if (val == zero_)
        {
            // Do something
        }
    }

private:
    T zero_;
};

ADDENDUM #2:

Let me put the above addendum in another, simpler way:

// zero is a member variable and is inialized in the container's constructor
T zero;
std::memset(&zero, 0, sizeof(zero));

T x = some_other_t;
if (x == zero)
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Upvoted because this seems to work fine. However I would sure like a better solution... –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 15:59
    
@doublep: Added another, more efficient solution to my answer. –  Emile Cormier Jun 5 '10 at 16:49
    
Unfortunately, this is atrocious for performance. When T itself is int, I'm getting 2.5x times slowdown on GCC 4.5 -O2 (this is a composite test of "almost-real" use). Apparently, GCC cannot optimize memcmp() away. –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 17:19
    
@douplep: I don't use memcmp() at all in my updated answer. –  Emile Cormier Jun 5 '10 at 17:48
    
This supposes that T is Default Constructible, which might not be the case. This also supposes that 0x00000000 is not a meaningful value of T. –  Matthieu M. Jun 5 '10 at 17:53
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Why not simply:

const Int zero = 0;
if (memcmp(&some_other_t, &zero, sizeof(zero)) == 0)
  /* some_other_t is 0 */

(you may want to try to add also the static qualifier to zero to see if it makes a difference performance-wise)

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Use a 33-bit computer. ;-P

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It feels like a hack, but apparently I found a solution: using volatile for Int casting. Essentially, what I am doing now is:

T x = some_other_t;
if (*reinterpret_cast <volatile Int*> (&x) == 0)
  ...

The problem with bitfield T is now gone. Still, I don't feel quite happy about this as volatile is not well-defined in C++ AFAIK...

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You might be on to something. I hope the language lawyers will see this and comment. –  Emile Cormier Jun 5 '10 at 18:29
    
I'm not an expert on these matters, but my understanding of the volatile keyword is that its only effect is to ensure the compiler will not make any optimisations that would lead to incorrect behaviour if the variable refers to e.g. an I/O register, i.e. something that can be modified externally. What you have above is not one of these situations, so you probably can't rely on volatile to guarantee correct behaviour. In other words, it's not a workaround for the strict-aliasing rules. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 5 '10 at 18:46
    
@Oli Charlesworth: From specification: [ Note: volatile is a hint to the implementation to avoid aggressive optimization involving the object because the value of the object might be changed by means undetectable by an implementation. See 1.9 for detailed semantics. In general, the semantics of volatile are intended to be the same in C++ as they are in C. — end note ] I'd say this case fits "might be changed by means undetectable by an implementation" definition, though it is of course debatable. –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 19:26
    
I am not a language lawyer, so the semantics of that spec point are indeed up for debate. However, if all it took to solve strict-aliasing problems was use of volatile, there would no longer be questions about strict aliasing on Stack Overflow! That there are still countless such question implies that this is not the solution! –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 5 '10 at 19:30
    
@Oli Charlesworth: You have a point; I asked this as a separate question. –  doublep Jun 5 '10 at 19:51
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