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In a current project, people can order goods delivered to their door and choose 'pay on delivery' as a payment option. To make sure the delivery guy has enough change customers are asked to input the amount they will pay (e.g. delivery is 48,13, they will pay with 60,- (3*20,-)). Now, if it were up to me I'd make it a free field, but apparantly higher-ups have decided is should be a selection based on available denominations, without giving amounts that would result in a set of denominations which could be smaller.

Example:

denominations = [1,2,5,10,20,50]
price = 78.12
possibilities:
    79  (multitude of options),
    80  (e.g. 4*20)
    90  (e.g. 50+2*20)
    100 (2*50)

It's international, so the denominations could change, and the algorithm should be based on that list.

The closest I have come which seems to work is this:

for all denominations in reversed order (large=>small)
    add ceil(price/denomination) * denomination to possibles
    baseprice = floor(price/denomination) * denomination;
    for all smaller denominations as subdenomination in reversed order
        add baseprice + (ceil((price - baseprice) / subdenomination) * subdenomination) to possibles
    end for
end for
remove doubles
sort

Is seems to work, but this has emerged after wildly trying all kinds of compact algorithms, and I cannot defend why it works, which could lead to some edge-case / new countries getting wrong options, and it does generate some serious amounts of doubles.

As this is probably not a new problem, and Google et al. could not provide me with an answer save for loads of pages calculating how to make exact change, I thought I'd ask SO: have you solved this problem before? Which algorithm? Any proof it will always work?

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1  
+1 for questioning your solution before committing it –  Jan Kuboschek Jun 5 '10 at 17:43
    
Can I just say that if the "goods" are anything resembling pizzas, you're probably way overthinking this? (Interesting algorithm question though...do carry on!) –  Jim Lewis Jun 5 '10 at 18:21
1  
Hey, didn't choose to overthink it, I was perfectly ready to cast anything in an input field to integer and let customers deal with weird brainfarts on their part themselves :) Would have taken about 2 minutes, instead of 3 hours & a multitude of failed tactics :) I challenged the assignment, failed to win the argument, and now I have to live with it due to my lack of persuasion... –  Wrikken Jun 5 '10 at 18:35
    
I'm sure we've all been there at one time or another... :-) –  Jim Lewis Jun 5 '10 at 18:50
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Its an application of the Greedy Algorithm http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GreedyAlgorithm.html (An algorithm used to recursively construct a set of objects from the smallest possible constituent parts)

Pseudocode

list={1,2,5,10,20,50,100} (*ordered *)
while list not null
   found_answer = false
   p = ceil(price) (* assume integer denominations *)
   while not found_answer
      find_greedy (p, list) (*algorithm in the reference above*)
      p++
   remove(first(list))

EDIT> some iterations are nonsense>

list={1,2,5,10,20,50,100} (*ordered *)
p = ceil(price) (* assume integer denominations *)
while list not null
   found_answer = false
   while not found_answer
      find_greedy (p, list) (*algorithm in the reference above*)
      p++
   remove(first(list))

EDIT>

I found an improvement due to Pearson on the Greedy algorithm. Its O(N^3 log Z), where N is the number of denominations and Z is the greatest bill of the set.

You can find it in http://library.wolfram.com/infocenter/MathSource/5187/

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Which variable holds the final list of values from which the customer can select? –  mbeckish Jun 5 '10 at 19:13
    
Each find_greedy return a possible answer, or nil –  belisarius Jun 5 '10 at 19:15
    
Seems promising, I'll brush up on my math, implement it, and come back with the results. –  Wrikken Jun 5 '10 at 20:30
    
It seems that the above alg can be improved by removing in the last step not only the head of the list but all denominations up to the smallest used in the last return of find_greedy –  belisarius Jun 5 '10 at 20:54
    
FYI: implementation & test will wait untill monday, way to nice weather to stay indoors atm. –  Wrikken Jun 6 '10 at 12:31
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You can generate in database all possible combination sets of payd coins and paper (im not good in english) and each row contains sum of this combination.

Having this database you can simple get all possible overpaid by one query,

WHERE sum >= cost and sum <= cost + epsilon

Some word about epsilon, hmm.. you can assign it from cost value? Maybe 10% of cost + 10 bucks?:

WHERE sum >= cost and sum <= cost * 1.10 + 10

Table structure must have number of columns representing number of coins and paper type. Value of each column have number of occurences of this type of paid item.

This is not optimal and fastest solution of this problem but easy and simple to implement. I think about better solution of this.


Other way you can for from cost to cost + epsilon and for each value calculate smallest possible number of paid items for each. I have algorithm for it. You can do this with this algorithm but this is in C++:

int R[10000];
sort(C, C + coins, cmp);

R[0]=0;

for(int i=1; i <= coins_weight; i++)
{
    R[i] = 1000000;
    for (int j=0; j < coins; j++) 
    {
        if((C[j].weight <= i) && ((C[j].value + R[i - C[j].weight]) < R[i]))
        {
            R[i] = C[j].value + R[i - C[j].weight];
        }
    }
}

return R[coins_weight];

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, a brute attack on all possibles. Can work, but some problems: (1) When an new denominationset is used we have to generate it (2) amount of denominations is variable, they cannot have their own column in the table. This would mean having a denominations table,a relation table & the lookuptable with a lotof doubles (amounts can be paid different ways / different combinations of denominations can amount to the same price) (3) For a higher amount in the table one should check wether the combination holds a denomination smaller then the difference). Performance for this wouldn't be good. –  Wrikken Jun 5 '10 at 18:10
    
You have right, this is only good for only small amounts of cost. –  Svisstack Jun 5 '10 at 18:27
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