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I have an XML document here that is served with a corresponding XSL file. The transformation is left to be executed client-side, without JavaScript.

This works fine in IE (shock horror), but in Google Chrome, just displays the document's text nodes.

I know that it is possible to do client-side XSL in Chrome, as I have seen examples of it, but I am yet to be able to replicate this success myself

What am I doing wrong?

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It would be great to post the solution, when you know it. I haven't really used Chrome for anything serious -- seems like a google-toy to me. Why do you need to perform XSLT client-side? –  Dimitre Novatchev Jun 5 '10 at 18:35
    
I don't. I just thought it would be kinda neat. And I'd still like to know why some things work on Chrome, but mine doesn't. Oh, and for IE users, sorry for the atrocious rainbow styling of the page. –  Eric Jun 5 '10 at 18:46
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For me Chrome can do the transformation only when opening the XML over http://, it does not work when working via file://, the xmlns-attribute does not make any difference for me. –  Jaroslav Záruba Nov 19 '10 at 9:58
    
Yeah, there's a bug filed somewhere for that as well... –  Eric Nov 19 '10 at 17:09
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The actual chrome bug for this is at code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=111905 –  Grant Peters Jun 28 '12 at 23:54
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7 Answers 7

The answer is wrong. That xmlns has totally nothing to do with it.

The real reason it doesn't work is due to the issue on security reasons.

Imagine this scenario:

  1. You receive an email message from an attacker containing a web page as an attachment, which you download.

  2. You open the now-local web page in your browser.

  3. The local web page creates an <iframe> whose source is https://mail.google.com/mail/.

  4. Because you are logged in to Gmail, the frame loads the messages in your inbox.

  5. The local web page reads the contents of the frame by using JavaScript to access frames[0].document.documentElement.innerHTML. (An Internet web page would not be able to perform this step because it would come from a non-Gmail origin; the same-origin policy would cause the read to fail.)

  6. The local web page places the contents of your inbox into a <textarea> and submits the data via a form POST to the attacker's web server. Now the attacker has your inbox, which may be useful for spamming or identify theft.

There is nothing Gmail can do to defend itself from this attack.

I do agree its annoying, as a fix you've got 2 solutions:

  1. Try running chrome with the --allow-file-access-from-files switch (I've not tested this myself)

  2. Upload it to a host, and everything will be fine.

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--allow-file-access-from-files works for me, thanks ! –  Grzegorz Szpetkowski Aug 23 '11 at 0:20
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np =) now all we need is for Eric to mark this as answer. –  Pacerier Aug 23 '11 at 7:34
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This is true, however that was not the only cause of the problem. I've been following the "bug" report for a while now. However, I couldn't get it to work server-side either without the xmlns attribute. This might have changed in newer versions of chrome. –  Eric Aug 25 '11 at 10:34
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@Eric ok this may not be an answer to your problem, but it is the correct answer to your question. judging by the comments of the visitors to this page, we can see that the answer that had been marked answer is not solving their problems. (otherwise why would they have to wade through the other 6 answers to find a solution) –  Pacerier Aug 26 '11 at 1:07
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@Pacerier: It's not the correct answer to my question. My question was asking about why a pair of documents hosted on my server were not being transformed correctly. The security problem, while worth knowing, is not relevant to this particular question. –  Eric Sep 30 '11 at 15:45
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up vote 12 down vote accepted

Ooh, solved it!

You need to have an XHTML namespace declaration:

<xsl:stylesheet xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" ... >

Now why is that not mentioned anywhere on the internet?

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Good find! Filled a bug for this. –  Mohamed Mansour Jun 5 '10 at 21:09
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Do I get an upvote for said 'good find'? –  Eric Jun 5 '10 at 21:36
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-1 : just not true, you don't need that declaration –  Peter May 23 '11 at 8:07
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@Eric: take a look at my answer, no offense, but your answer is wrong. –  Pacerier Aug 23 '11 at 7:35
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This is not the answer (nor the solution, and the "..." is definitely a bit vague), Pacerier's is the correct one. –  RedGlyph Sep 30 '11 at 9:07
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I had the same problem on localhost. Running around the Internet looking for the answer and I approve that adding --allow-file-access-from-files works. I work on Mac, so for me I had to go through terminal sudo /Applications/Google\ Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google\ Chrome --allow-file-access-from-files and enter your password (if you have one).

Another small thing - nothing will work unless you add to your .xml file the reference to your .xsl file as follows <?xml-stylesheet type="text/xsl" href="<path to file>"?>. Another small thing I didn't realise immediately - you should be opening your .xml file in browser, no the .xsl.

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Check http://www.aranedabienesraices.com.ar

This site is built with XML/XSLT client-side. It works on IE6-7-8, FF, O, Safari and Chrome. Are you sending HTTP headers correctly? Are you respecting the same-origin policy?

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See my answer, I've solved it. Chrome seems to require an xmlns attribute. –  Eric Jun 8 '10 at 13:25
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I don't think so. To perform the transformation, Chrome does not need to set the default namespace to XHTML namespace. To render XHTML it needs proper XHTML, of course. You are mixing things. –  user357812 Jun 8 '10 at 13:45
    
The site referenced above is not built with XML but with XHTML. The two are not quite the same (both are XML but one is also HTML and the other is not). –  jerseyboy Feb 8 '12 at 0:38
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Well it does not work if the XML file (starting by the standard PI:

<?xml-stylesheet type="text/xsl" href="..."?>

for referencing the XSL stylesheet) is served as "application/xml". In that case, Chrome will still download the referenced XSL stylesheet, but nothing will be rendered, as it will silently change the document types from "application/xml" into "Document" (!??) and "text/xsl" into "Stylesheet" (!??), and then will attempt to render the XML document as if it was an HTML(5) document, without running first its XSLT processor. And Nothing at all will be displayed in the screen (whose content will continue to show the previous page from which the XML page was referenced, and will continue spinning the icon, as if the document was never completely loaded.

You can perfectly use the Chrome console, that shows that all resources are loaded, but they are incorrectly interpreted.

So yes, Chrome currently only render XML files (with its optional leading XSL stylesheet declaration), only if it is served as "text/xml", but not as "application/xml" as it should for client-side rendered XML with an XSL declaration.

For XML files served as "text/xml" or "application/xml" and that do not contain an XSL stylesheet declaration, Chrome should still use a default stylesheet to render it as a DOM tree, or at least as its text source. But it does not, and here again it attempts to render it as if it was HTML, and bugs immediately on many scripts (including a default internal one) that attempt to access to "document.body" for handling onLoad events and inject some javascript handler in it.

An example of site that does not work as expected (the Common Lisp documentation) in Chrome, but works in IE which supports client-side XSLT:

http://common-lisp.net/project/bknr/static/lmman/toc.html

This index page above is displayed correctly, but all links will drive to XML documents with a basic XSL declaration to an existing XSL stylesheet document, and you can wait indefinitely, thinking that the chapters have problems to be downloaded. All you can do to read the docuemntation is to open the console and read the source code in the Resources tab.

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As close as I can tell, Chrome is looking for the header

Content-Type: text/xml

Then it works --- other iterations have failed.

Make sure your web server is providing this. It also explains why it fails for file://URI xml files.

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I tried putting the file in the wwwroot. So when accessing the page in Chrome, this is the address localhost/yourpage.xml.

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