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I'm creating jQuery plugins using the pattern from the Plugins Authoring page:

(function($) {

   $.fn.myPlugin = function(settings) {
     var config = {'foo': 'bar'};

     if (settings) $.extend(config, settings);

     this.each(function() {
       // element-specific code here
     });

     return this;

   };

 })(jQuery);

My code calls for several private methods that manipulate this. I am calling these private methods using the apply(this, arguments) pattern. Is there a way of designing my plugin such that I don't have to call apply to pass this from method to method?

My modified plugin code looks roughly like this:

(function($) {

   $.fn.myPlugin = function(settings) {
     var config = {'foo': 'bar'};

     if (settings) $.extend(config, settings);

     this.each(function() {
       method1.apply(this);
     });

     return this;

   };

   function method1() {
     // do stuff with $(this)
     method2.apply(this);
   }

   function method2() {
     // do stuff with $(this), etc... 
   }

 })(jQuery);
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3 Answers

I think jQuery.proxy was created for these problems, though in general it does similar to what you do:

this.each(jQuery.proxy(method1, this));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. The jQuery.proxy function is new to me. Isn't it simply syntactic sugar for method1.apply()? –  thebossman Jun 6 '10 at 17:18
    
@thebossman - It's an .apply() internally: github.com/jquery/jquery/blob/master/src/core.js#L689 –  Nick Craver Jun 7 '10 at 12:18
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Just create a scoped variable that points to this

(function($) {
   var me;
   $.fn.myPlugin = function(settings) {
     var config = {'foo': 'bar'};
     if (settings) $.extend(config, settings);
     me = this;
     this.each(method1);
     return this;
   };

   function method1() {
     // do stuff with me
     method2();
   }

   function method2() {
     // do stuff with me, etc... 
   }

 })(jQuery);
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2  
You should use me in those methods, not $(me), this is already a jQuery object, it's an unnecessary clone when re-wrapping it. I would have a read here for common mistakes like this: remysharp.com/2010/06/03/… –  Nick Craver Jun 5 '10 at 20:57
1  
I don't use jQuery myself, its a crappy library :) But I'll update the answer –  Sean Kinsey Jun 5 '10 at 22:26
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I can suggest two ways:

  1. This way more clearly but not exactly responsible for the task

    (function( $ ) {
       $.fn.myPlugin = function(settings) {
        var config = {'foo': 'bar'};
    
        if (settings) $.extend(config, settings);
    
        this.each(function() {
          method1($(this));
        });
    
        return this;
    
      };
    
      function method1(_this) {
        // do stuff with _this)
        alert(_this.attr('id'));
        method2(_this);
      }
    
      function method2(_this) {
      alert(_this.attr('customAttr'));
        // do stuff with _this, etc... 
      }
    })(jQuery);
    
  2. This way is more extremally)))

     (function( $ ) {
       var privates = {
          method1: function() {
             // do stuff with this
             alert(this.attr('id'));
             this.method2();
          },
          method2: function () {
             alert(this.attr('customAttr'));
             // do stuff with this, etc... 
          }
        }   
        $.fn.myPlugin = function(settings) {
           var config = {'foo': 'bar'};
    
           if (settings) $.extend(config, settings);
    
           this.each(function() {
              var $this = $(this);
              $.extend($this, privates)
              $this.method1();
           });
    
           return this;
        };
    })(jQuery);
    
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