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I'm trying to learn patterns and I'm stuck on determining how or where a Factory Pattern determines what class to instanciate. If I have a Application that calls the factory and sends it, say, an xml config file to determine what type of action to take, where does that logic for interpreting the config file happen?

THE FACTORY

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace myNamespace
{
    public abstract class SourceFactory
    {
        abstract public UploadSource getUploadSource();
    }
    public class TextSourceFactory : SourceFactory
    {
        public override UploadSource getUploadSource()
        {
            return new TextUploadSource();
        }
    }
    public class XmlSourceFacotry : SourceFactory
    {
        public override UploadSource getUploadSource()
        {
            return new XmlUploadSource();
        }
    }
    public class SqlSourceFactory : SourceFactory
    {
        public override UploadSource getUploadSource()
        {
            return new SqlUploadSource();
        }
    }
}

THE CLASSES

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace myNamespace
{
    public abstract class UploadSource
    {
        abstract public void Execute();
    }
    public class TextUploadSource : UploadSource
    {
        public override void Execute()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You executed a text upload source");
        }
    }
    public class XmlUploadSource : UploadSource
    {
        public override void Execute()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You executed an XML upload source");
        }
    }
    public class SqlUploadSource : UploadSource
    {
        public override void Execute()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You executed a SQL upload source");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Understood that you are just learning the patterns. In a production environment, you are often better off using an Inversion of Control Container which implements the factory and other creation patterns. In the C# world, Castle-Windsor is a common IOC container. As @peter notes below, the factory loader is responsible for interpreting the configuration. Often this takes the form of "for this interface, load this concrete class". –  Rob Jun 5 '10 at 22:27
    
@Rob: When does a programmer (or wannabe programmer) get to the place where they are designing reusable, flexable, loosely coupled, strongly cohesive software? It ain't oop, and it ain't patterns, because now it's IOC. Where does the buck stop? –  Chris Hayes Jun 6 '10 at 0:13
    
IOC is simply a tool that makes creation patterns easier to implement. Personally, I love it when somebody writes a bunch of software that makes my job easier. –  Rob Jun 6 '10 at 2:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The actual factory to instantiate is selected at runtime, often by a separate factory loader class. The loader may get the necessary configuration, e.g. in an xml config file, and read from it the class name of the concrete factory to load.

This in itself is not a very complicated logic; the reason to put it into a factory loader class is reusability. You can have many factories in your app, and often, most of the factory loading code is pretty similar, so putting it into a separate class (hierarchy) eliminates code duplication. And of course, the logic may be different and more complicated than this example.

E.g. a more dynamic scenario would be to specify a mapping between buttons / menu items and class names in the xml file, then on the GUI, the user could change the factory to be used by pressing a button / selecting a menu item.

share|improve this answer
    
So you would have a seperate inheritance tree based off an interface for the factory loader, where each different concrete instantiation contains specific logic to whatever object needs to be created? –  theringostarrs Mar 30 '11 at 21:18
    
@theringostarrs, the logic is practically the same and one, only the concrete factory class differs. So one can use composition as well - in fact I would probably prefer that, if possible. –  Péter Török Mar 30 '11 at 21:28

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