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Trying to understand resources in java-land. I believe the following is true:

  • Resources loaded via the classpath have no namespace, they only have a file name.
  • It's wisest to always load resources via the classpath, never via the file system, even in unit tests.

Therefore, resources must always have unique file names, or collisions will occur.

Are there flaws in my assumptions or my conclusion?

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Define what you mean by "file name." If you're loading resources using the ClassLoader you can have 10000 files named "picture.jpg" for all it cares, as long as they're in different packages. Maybe you're not realizing that when you do Class.getResource[AsStream]() it's searching relative to the class's current package, unless you prefix with / to make the path absolute. –  Mark Peters Jun 6 '10 at 2:02
    
Thanks MarkPeters. I have had some confusion about whether packages have meaning when it comes to resources. Your comment equates to a simple "no" answer to my quesion, which is very helpful! –  morgancodes Jun 6 '10 at 3:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assumption 1) Resources loaded via the classpath have no namespace, they only have a file name.

Resources loaded from the classpath are actually identified by a pathname not a simple filename. You could view the directory parts of the pathnames as forming namespaces.

Also if you load using Class.getResourceAsStream(String pathname), a pathname that does not start with a "/" will be interpreted as relative to the pathname for the classes package.

The classpath mechanism works by overlaying the namespaces of each JAR file, etc on the classpath. So you could have multiple resources in different JARs with the same pathname, but only one will be actually visible. (You describe this later as a "collision".) But from the perspective of the set of pathnames that are visible, each pathname uniquely identifies a resource.

Assumption 2) It's wisest to always load resources via the classpath, never via the file system, even in unit tests.

If we are talking about the resources of the application, then loading from the classpath has definite advantages. However, if we are talking about resources that are created and managed by the application, then loading via the classpath has problems ... because you cannot write resources to the classpath.

Also, even with a clarification of what you mean by "resource", I don't think it is correct to say that it is always wisest to load resources via the classpath. We cannot possibly anticipate all scenarios / use-cases, and therefore cannot say that there may not be some scenario / use-case where the wisest approach is to load the resource some other way. (However, if you were to say "generally" or "usually" instead of "always" I would agree with the assumption.)

Conclusion 3) Therefore, resources must always have unique file names, or collisions will occur.

If resources coming from different JARs on the classpath have non-unique pathnames, then you do get a kind of collision and one or other of the resources will not be loadable (at least, not via the normal classloader APIs). But this may be exactly what you may want to happen!

Are there flaws in my assumptions or my conclusion?

  • Assumption 1) is false on the face of it, but it can be reinterpreted in a way that makes it true.

  • Conclusion 3) logically follows from the reinterpreted assumption 1).

  • Assumption 2) is also false, but can be reinterpreted in a way that makes it true: i.e. relax "always", and define what you mean by "resource". However, this assumption is not logically required for the conclusion.

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Nope, except that for all intents and purposes packages with the associated dot-notation and file structure serve as namespaces.

Personally I find loading resources especially useful for unit testing, because by playing with the classpath I can make sure to hide the production resources by test versions.

In practice I found that when using consistent package based naming schemes, I have seldom conflicts. It's a bit verbose, but we're used to that in Javaland.

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Thanks Peter. Are you saying that you like to name your resources with dot notation? Like have a file named "com.myapp.thingies.config.properties"? –  morgancodes Jun 5 '10 at 23:53
    
No, I guess I am saying that I do not like it, but that it works in practice. The tricks in testing are merely the result of a consistent approaches with the classpath, packaging. This consistency allowed people to invent good uses of these 'habits'. Tools like maven and the modern IDE's automate away a lot of the pain, thanks to that consistency. But it aint fun and it hurts my eyes. –  Peter Tillemans Jun 6 '10 at 0:04

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