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Can I install just OpenJDK without proprietary Sun JRE/JDK and use NetBeans and Eclipse without significant disadvantages?

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3 Answers 3

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Yes you can. I'm using NetBeans with OpenJDK in Linux.

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OpenJDK is supposed to be fully compatible with Sun's JDK (in fact it is Sun's JDK for the most part, with the proprietary parts replaced by open source software).

Almost all Java software, including NetBeans and Eclipse, runs without any problems on OpenJDK.

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In theory - yes, in practice - not so much... I personally had strange issues trying to run apps on OpenJDK and they tend to push bug fixes a lot slower there... –  Bozhidar Batsov Jun 6 '10 at 6:13
    
I've used Eclipse and NetBeans on OpenJDK on Ubuntu myself, never had any strange problems. I did have some problems with programs that were checking the Java version and didn't recognise OpenJDK. That's a bug in those programs though, not in OpenJDK. –  Jesper Jun 6 '10 at 9:17

You can run just OpenJDK or just Sun JDK and I'm pretty sure you can also run them side by side if you'd like with eclipse and/or netbeans. In my opinion, I think it would be best to go for Sun but if you'd really prefer to have OpenJDK instead, I believe it's pretty solid.

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Why would you prefer using Sun JRE/JDK over OpenJDK then? –  Ivan Jun 6 '10 at 5:48
    
I prefer using Sun because 1) I believe that Sun's JRE/JDK in theory is still "more solid" compared to OpenJDK. I've heard very few users encounter odd bugs in OpenJDK 2) I don't mind using proprietary software. –  Coding District Jun 6 '10 at 7:02

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