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Normally, in Delphi one would declare a function with a variable number of arguments using the 'array of const' method. However, for compatibility with code written in C, there's an much-unknown 'varargs' directive that can be added to a function declaration (I learned this while reading Rudy's excellent 'Pitfalls of convering' document).

As an example, one could have a function in C, declared like this :

void printf(const char *fmt, ...)

In Delphi, this would become :

procedure printf(const fmt: PChar); varargs;

My question is : How can I get to the contents of the stack when implementing a method which is defined with the 'varargs' directive?

I would expect that some tooling for this exists, like Dephi translations of the va_start(), va_arg() and va_end() functions, but I can't find this anywhere.

Please help!

PS: Please don't drift off in discussions about the 'why' or the 'array of const' alternative - I need this to write C-like patches for functions inside Xbox games (see the Delphi Xbox emulator project 'Dxbx' on sourceforge for details).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

OK, I see the clarification in your question to mean that you need to implement a C import in Delphi. In that case, you need to implement varargs yourself.

The basic knowledge needed is the C calling convention on the x86: the stack grows downwards, and C pushes arguments from right to left. Thus, a pointer to the last declared argument, after it is incremented by the size of the last declared argument, will point to the tail argument list. From then, it's simply a matter of reading the argument out and incrementing the pointer by an appropriate size to move deeper into the stack. The x86 stack in 32-bit mode is 4-byte aligned generally, and this also means that bytes and words are passed as 32-bit integers.

Anyhow, here's a helper record in a demo program that shows how to read out data. Note that Delphi seems to be passing Extended types in a very odd way; however, you likely won't have to worry about that, as 10-byte floats aren't generally widely used in C, and aren't even implemented in the latest MS C, IIRC.

{$apptype console}

type  
  TArgPtr = record
  private
    FArgPtr: PByte;
    class function Align(Ptr: Pointer; Align: Integer): Pointer; static;
  public
    constructor Create(LastArg: Pointer; Size: Integer);
    // Read bytes, signed words etc. using Int32
    // Make an unsigned version if necessary.
    function ReadInt32: Integer;
    // Exact floating-point semantics depend on C compiler.
    // Delphi compiler passes Extended as 10-byte float; most C
    // compilers pass all floating-point values as 8-byte floats.
    function ReadDouble: Double;
    function ReadExtended: Extended;
    function ReadPChar: PChar;
    procedure ReadArg(var Arg; Size: Integer);
  end;

constructor TArgPtr.Create(LastArg: Pointer; Size: Integer);
begin
  FArgPtr := LastArg;
  // 32-bit x86 stack is generally 4-byte aligned
  FArgPtr := Align(FArgPtr + Size, 4);
end;

class function TArgPtr.Align(Ptr: Pointer; Align: Integer): Pointer;
begin
  Integer(Result) := (Integer(Ptr) + Align - 1) and not (Align - 1);
end;

function TArgPtr.ReadInt32: Integer;
begin
  ReadArg(Result, SizeOf(Integer));
end;

function TArgPtr.ReadDouble: Double;
begin
  ReadArg(Result, SizeOf(Double));
end;

function TArgPtr.ReadExtended: Extended;
begin
  ReadArg(Result, SizeOf(Extended));
end;

function TArgPtr.ReadPChar: PChar;
begin
  ReadArg(Result, SizeOf(PChar));
end;

procedure TArgPtr.ReadArg(var Arg; Size: Integer);
begin
  Move(FArgPtr^, Arg, Size);
  FArgPtr := Align(FArgPtr + Size, 4);
end;

procedure Dump(const types: string); cdecl;
var
  ap: TArgPtr;
  cp: PChar;
begin
  cp := PChar(types);
  ap := TArgPtr.Create(@types, SizeOf(string));
  while True do
  begin
    case cp^ of
      #0: 
      begin
        Writeln;
        Exit;
      end;

      'i': Write(ap.ReadInt32, ' ');
      'd': Write(ap.ReadDouble, ' ');
      'e': Write(ap.ReadExtended, ' ');
      's': Write(ap.ReadPChar, ' ');
    else
      Writeln('Unknown format');
      Exit;
    end;
    Inc(cp);
  end;
end;

type
  PDump = procedure(const types: string) cdecl varargs;
var
  MyDump: PDump;

function AsDouble(e: Extended): Double;
begin
  Result := e;
end;

function AsSingle(e: Extended): Single;
begin
  Result := e;
end;

procedure Go;
begin
  MyDump := @Dump;

  MyDump('iii', 10, 20, 30);
  MyDump('sss', 'foo', 'bar', 'baz');

  // Looks like Delphi passes Extended in byte-aligned
  // stack offset, very strange; thus this doesn't work.
  MyDump('e', 2.0);
  // These two are more reliable.
  MyDump('d', AsDouble(2));
  // Singles passed as 8-byte floats.
  MyDump('d', AsSingle(2));
end;

begin
  Go;
end.
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1  
This looks great! I was surprised to see there's indeed no need to use assembly for getting to the ESP register contents. Thanks for this - great example too! –  PatrickvL Nov 21 '08 at 7:58
    
Note that the code needs adaptation if it is to work on x64 - the Align function in particular truncates pointers to 32-bit values. –  Barry Kelly May 20 at 12:37

I found this (from a guy we know :))

To write this stuff properly you'll need to use BASM, Delphi's built in assembler, and code the call sequence in asm. Hopefully you've got a good idea of what you need to do. Perhaps a post in the .basm group will help if you get stuck.

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Delphi doesn't let you implement a varargs routine. It only works for importing external cdecl functions that use this.

Since varargs is based on the cdecl calling convention, you basically need to reimplement it yourself in Delphi, using assembly and/or various kinds of pointer manipulation.

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No, the list of arguments is only zero-terminated if the caller passes zero as the last argument. The page you cite says so. The printf function doesn't need to have a zero to terminate the list because it can figure out how many arguments there are based on the format string. –  Rob Kennedy Nov 18 '08 at 15:14
    
Right then, my mistake. I'll edit accordingly. –  Michael Madsen Nov 18 '08 at 21:03

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