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This is a loop in a function intending to create elements <li> and give each <li> an unique id. But it's not working. I suspect it's a simple syntax error with the use of quote in .attr(). But I can't get a straight answer from Google.

for (i=0;i<array.length;i++)
{
//create HTML element of tag li
$('#suggest').append("<li></li>");
$("li").attr("id",'li'+i);
$('#li'+i).html(array[i]);
}
share|improve this question
    
+1 for intelligent guess. – SLaks Jun 6 '10 at 12:02
up vote 5 down vote accepted

use it like this

$suggest = $('#suggest');
for (i=0;i<array.length;i++) { 
  $suggest.append($('<li/>', {
     id:    'li'+i,
     html:  array[i]
  })); 
} 

For best performance results do:

var str = '';
for (i=0;i<array.length; i++) {
   str += '<li id=\'li' + i + '\'>' + array[i] + '</li>';
}
$('#suggest').append(str);
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2  
+1, but probably best to put a var suggest = $('#suggest'); at the top and reuse it, rather than looking it up every time. – T.J. Crowder Jun 6 '10 at 12:04
    
yes indeed, caching on such kind of loops is a great idea – jAndy Jun 6 '10 at 12:05
1  
You're missing the closing parenthesis for append() in the first example. Just looks like it's there because of the $(). – user113716 Jun 6 '10 at 12:36
    
@patrick: good point, fixed that – jAndy Jun 6 '10 at 12:37
    
+1 - Just did a quick 'n dirty performance test using Safari, giving the for loop a count of 1000. Your second example certainly is faster, upwards of 6x. (118ms vs 20ms). Interestingly, using html() instead of append() nearly doubled the speed once again bringing it to 12ms. Of course, this assumes the #suggest has no worries about overwriting content. – user113716 Jun 6 '10 at 12:47

By writing $('li'), you're setting the ID of every <li> in the document.

You don't need to add IDs at all.
Instead, you should assemble each <li> element before appending it, like this:

var newLi = $('<li></li>').html(array[i]);
//Do things to newLi
$('#suggest').append(newLi);

Note that if you add an event handler inside the loop, it will share the i variable, leading to unexpected results.
Instead, if you need i in the event handler, you should move the body of the loop to a separate function that takes i as a parameter.

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Thank you for pointing out the mistake – Philip007 Jun 6 '10 at 13:08
    
But i do need to set the id of li for later use. – Philip007 Jun 6 '10 at 13:16
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(function () {

            function createListItems(howmany, container) {
                for (i = 0; i < howmany; i++) {
                    container.append('<li id="listItem' + i + '">');
                }
            }

            createListItems(3, $('#unorderedList1'));

        });

    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <ul id="unorderedList1">

    </ul>
    </body>
share|improve this answer

You can simply do:

for (i=0;i<array.length;i++)
{
  //create HTML element of tag li
  $('#suggest').append("<li id='li" + i + "'></li>");
  $('#li'+i).html(array[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The single quote and double quote in your script don't make sense to me. Could you explain it to me? – Philip007 Jun 6 '10 at 13:43

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