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Hey everyone, I would like to wrap the String.format() method with in my own Logger class. I can't figure a way how to pass arguments from my method to String.format().

public class Logger
    public static void format(String format, Object... args)
         print(String.format(format, args)); // <-- this gives an error obviously.

    public static void print(String s)
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And what would that error be? – James K Polk Jun 6 '10 at 12:00
Yeah. What's the error? It looks fine to me. – Dave Ray Jun 6 '10 at 12:09
error probably comes if you pass more than one arg – eugeneK Jun 6 '10 at 12:14
Compiles fine for me, for the record. – Cowan Jun 6 '10 at 12:31
Sorry guys. False alarm. (: I am using lejos Java virtual machine. And they do not have String.format(String format, Objects[] args) method implemented. – Martynas Jun 6 '10 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your code works. The vararg is more or less simply a syntactic boxing of the vararg.

In other words,the following two statements are actually identical:

String.format("%s %s", "Foo", "Bar")
String.format("%s %s", new Object[] {"Foo", "Bar"})

Your args in your code will always be an Object[], no matter if you have 0, 1, 2 or any other number of arguments.

Note that this is determined at compile time and looks at the static type of the object, so String.format("%s %s", (Object)new Object[] {"Foo", "Bar"}) will cause the array to be treated as a single object (and in this case cause a runtime error to be thrown).

If you still have problems with your code, please check that your example really is identical to how your code works.

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I think this will work:

print(String.format(format, (Object[])args));

Hope it works. I have not tested it. Good luck

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