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I have the following code snippet. This is a c file in visual studio 2010. If i try to compile this with the line: int hello = 10; commented out it will compile just fine. If I comment that line in it will not compile. Am I missing something or should I not be using Visual Studio 2010 to compile C code. If this is a Visual Studio problem can anyone recommend a easy to use IDE / Compiler that I can for C.

Thank You

int* x = (int*) calloc(1, sizeof(int));

*x = 5;

//int hello = 10;

printf("Hello World!  %i", *x);

getchar();
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3  
"it will not compile": care to tell us the compiler error? –  John Saunders Jun 6 '10 at 19:15
    
What compilation error do you get? –  Preston Jun 6 '10 at 19:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can't have declarations (like int hello = 10;) after non-declarations (like *x = 5;) in C89, unlike C99 or C++.

MSVC 2010 still does not support C99.

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+1, wow, I am impressed ^^ –  Max Jun 6 '10 at 19:21
5  
I guess 11 years isn't quite enough time for a multi-billion dollar corporation to implement a standard. Seriously, what could be the reason for the lack of support? –  Mark Rushakoff Jun 6 '10 at 22:29

you can still declare variables after coding. just change the "yourProject.c" file to "yourProject.cpp" and it will work fine.

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typecasting a malloc return pointer in C is a bad practice and has undefined results.

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Sure, it's a bad practice but it has defined results. –  user411313 May 19 '12 at 11:39
    
stackoverflow.com/q/605845/143897 –  Jay D May 19 '12 at 21:16
    
you should NEVER cast a malloc return pointer in C . in C++ its a different story –  Jay D May 19 '12 at 21:16

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