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void main()
{
    int xyz = 123; // original value
    { // code block starts
        xyz++;
        if(xyz < 1000)
            xyz = 1;
    } // code block ends
    int original_value = xyz; // should be 123
}

void main()
{
    int xyz = 123; // original value
    MACRO_NAME(xyz = 123) // the macro takes the code code that should be executed at the end of the block.
    { // code block starts
        xyz++;
        if(xyz < 1000)
            xyz = 1;
    } // code block ends << how to make the macro execute the "xyz = 123" statement?
    int original_value = xyz; // should be 123
}

Only the first main() works.
I think the comments explain the issue.

It doesn't need to be a macro but to me it just sounds like a classical "macro-needed" case.

By the way, there's the BOOST_FOREACH macro/library and I think it does the exact same thing I'm trying to achieve but it's too complex for me to find the essence of what I need.
From its introductory manual page, an example:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::string hello( "Hello, world!" );

    BOOST_FOREACH( char ch, hello )
    {
        std::cout << ch;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to do this anyways –  Matti Virkkunen Jun 6 '10 at 21:40
    
I have an object which has a pointer. I need to temporarily change this pointer, thus, return it to its original value, and I'd like to to be automated, instead of "forgetting". No destructor is wanted because this object is given the the function, and should be returned as given. –  Poni Jun 6 '10 at 21:45
    
You are getting bad results because you are using void main(). The main function returns an int, always. Anything else is undefined behavior. –  Thomas Matthews Jun 6 '10 at 23:34
    
There's pedantry, and then there's that. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jun 7 '10 at 5:05
    
Sure, yet we wouldn't need computers in our world if pedantry would be everything - you know - a human might mistake anyway (: –  Poni Jun 7 '10 at 13:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The cleanest way to do this is probably to use an RAII container to reset the value:

// Assumes T's assignment does not throw
template <typename T> struct ResetValue
{
    ResetValue(T& o, T v) : object_(o), value_(v) { }
    ~ResetValue() { object_ = value_; }

    T& object_;
    T value_;
};

used as:

{
    ResetValue<int> resetter(xyz, 123);
    // ...
}

When the block ends, the destructor will be called, resetting the object to the specified value.

If you really want to use a macro, as long as it is a relatively simple expression, you can do this using a for-block:

for (bool b = false; b == false; b = true, (xyz = 123))
{
    // ...
}

which can be turned into a macro:

#define DO_AFTER_BLOCK(expr) \
    for (bool DO_AFTER_BLOCK_FLAG = false; \
         DO_AFTER_BLOCK_FLAG == false; \
         DO_AFTER_BLOCK_FLAG = true, (expr))

used as:

DO_AFTER_BLOCK(xyz = 123)
{
    // ...
}

I don't really think the macro approach is a good idea; I'd probably find it confusing were I to see this in production source code.

share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant!! Thank you so much! .. and thanks to everyone else who tried! –  Poni Jun 6 '10 at 21:49
    
With a bit of trickery (non-template base class ResetValueBase, a typedef for ResetValueBase const& and a template helper function ResetValue<T> reset(T&, T) you don't need to pass in the type of the value you want to reset. Basically you'd write ResetValueBase const& resetter = reset(xyz,123); –  MSalters Jun 7 '10 at 13:28
    
Actually James' macro solution is the answer, to my specific question at least. –  Poni Jun 7 '10 at 13:40

You don't absolutely need a macro - you could use inner scope variables:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
    int xyz = 123;
    printf("xyz = %d\n", xyz);
    {
        int pqr = xyz;
        int xyz = pqr;
        printf("xyz = %d\n", xyz);
        xyz++;
        if (xyz < 1000)
            xyz = 1;
        printf("xyz = %d\n", xyz);
    }
    printf("xyz = %d\n", xyz);
    return(0);
}

This produces the output:

xyz = 123
xyz = 123
xyz = 1
xyz = 123

If you compile with GCC and -Wshadow you get a warning; otherwise, it compiles clean. You can't write int xyz = xyz; in the inner block reliably; once the '=' is parsed, the declaration is complete and so the initializer is the inner 'xyz', not the outer. The two step dance works, though.

The primary demerit of this is that it requires a modification in the code block.

If there are side-effects in the block - like the print statements above - you could call a function that contains the inner block. If there are no side-effects in the block, why are you executing it at all.

#include <stdio.h>
static void inner(int xyz)
{
    printf("xyz = %d\n", xyz);
    xyz++;
    if (xyz < 1000)
        xyz = 1;
    printf("xyz = %d\n", xyz);
}

int main(void)
{
    int xyz = 123;
    printf("xyz = %d\n", xyz);
    inner(xyz);
    printf("xyz = %d\n", xyz);
    return(0);
}
share|improve this answer

You can't make a macro perform a command after a loop unless you put the loop in the macro. And seriously? It would be a much better idea just to make a scoped variable.

template<typename T> class CallFunctionOnScopeExit {
    T t;
public:
    CallFunctionOnScopeExit(T tt) : t(tt) {}
    ~CallFunctionOnScopeExit() { t(); }
};

Guaranteed in the cases of exception, etc, whereas the macro version most definitely isn't. I would prefer to use this pattern for the exception guarantees, and because it's more flexible than just copying the int.

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