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I read this question in some post on SO, so please explain this.

Thanking you.

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Nice que diecho. –  KC Rajput Jun 16 '10 at 15:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

The '+' operator is defined for both strings and numbers, so when you apply it to a string and a number, the number will be converted so string, then the strings will be concatenated: '7' + 4 => '7' + '4' => '74' But '-' is only defined for numbers, not strings, so the string '7' will be converted to number: '7' - 4 => 7 - 4 => 3

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The + operator is overloaded in JavaScript to perform concatenation and addition. The way JavaScript determines which operation to carry out is based on the operands. If one of the operands is not of class Number (or the number primitive type), then both will be casted to strings for concatenation.

3 + 3 = 6
3 + '3' = 33
'3' + 3 = 33
(new Object) + 3 = '[object Object]3'

The - operator, however, is only for numbers and thus the operands will always be cast to numbers during the operation.

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gotta love the way java works and all the fun bugs it causes. –  pxl Jun 7 '10 at 8:37
    
woops, meant javascript, typed java. –  pxl Jun 7 '10 at 8:48
    
Nobody made a joke about weak typing here? That disappoints me. –  Eric Smekens Apr 11 '13 at 13:50

+ is the String concatenation operator so when you do '7' + 4 you're coercing 4 into a string and appending it. There is no such ambiguity with the - operator.

If you want to be unambiguous use parseInt() or parseFloat():

parseInt('7', 10) + 4

Why specify the radix to 10? So '077' isn't parsed as octal.

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Just in case: Use parseInt('7', 10) with the base parameter, so that '077' will not be mistaken as an octal integer. –  Residuum Jun 7 '10 at 8:19
    
@Residuum excellent point. –  cletus Jun 7 '10 at 8:22
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Or... you could use Number('077') which somewhat acts like parseFloat and always treats strings as base 10. –  Delan Azabani Jun 7 '10 at 8:22
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You could also just use +'7' + 4 –  Gordon Tucker Jun 7 '10 at 15:47

Because + is for concentration, if you want to add two numbers you should parse them first parseInt() and - sign is for subtraction

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The sign + in Javascript is interpreted as concatenation first then addition, due to the fact that the first part is a string ('7'). Thus the interpreter converts the 2nd part (4) into string and concatenate it.

As for '7' - 4, there is no other meaning other than subtraction, thus subtraction is done.

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