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I noticed a Python script I was writing was acting squirrelly, and traced it to an infinite loop, where the loop condition was while line is not ''. Running through it in the debugger, it turned out that line was in fact ''. When I changed it to !='' rather than is not '', it worked fine.

Also, is it generally considered better to just use '==' by default, even when comparing int or Boolean values? I've always liked to use 'is' because I find it more aesthetically pleasing and pythonic (which is how I fell into this trap...), but I wonder if it's intended to just be reserved for when you care about finding two objects with the same id.

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marked as duplicate by Frédéric Hamidi, Prashant Kumar, Tom Leese, Niels Keurentjes, Hannes Ovrén Dec 21 '13 at 16:03

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How is this "counter to your experience"? NaN is the only built-in counterexample; you're simply misunderstanding directional relations. The spec says "For all built-in Python objects (like strings, lists, dicts, functions, etc.), if x is y, then x==y is also True.", not "For all built-in Python objects (like strings, lists, dicts, functions, etc.), if x==y, then x is y is also True." For some reason, you're pretending it says the latter. It doesn't. You see that equality matches, but is doesn't. That is perfectly allowed by the former quoted statement. –  codetaku Jul 16 at 15:20
    
Yup. My reading of that was completely confused. I edited it out of the question, because I don't think it will be useful to future readers. –  Coquelicot Aug 21 at 18:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 247 down vote accepted

For all built-in Python objects (like strings, lists, dicts, functions, etc.), if x is y, then x==y is also True.

Not always. NaN is a counterexample. But usually, identity (is) implies equality (==). The converse is not true: Two distinct objects can have the same value.

Also, is it generally considered better to just use '==' by default, even when comparing int or Boolean values?

You use == when comparing values and is when comparing identities.

When comparing ints (or immutable types in general), you pretty much always want the former. There's an optimization that allows small integers to be compared with is, but don't rely on it.

For boolean values, you shouldn't be doing comparisons at all. Instead of:

if x == True:
    # do something

write:

if x:
    # do something

For comparing against None, is None is preferred over == None.

I've always liked to use 'is' because I find it more aesthetically pleasing and pythonic (which is how I fell into this trap...), but I wonder if it's intended to just be reserved for when you care about finding two objects with the same id.

Yes, that's exactly what it's for.

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Thanks, very clear answer. I'm not sure I agree about comparing booleans though (unless you just meant you shouldn't compare to a boolean literal). If I have two boolean variables or expressions, I would think it would be valid to do bool_a != bool_b as a shorthand for xor. –  Coquelicot Jun 7 '10 at 9:14
1  
@Coquelicot: That wouldn't work because Python allows anything to be used as a boolean expression. If you have bool_a == 3 and bool_b == 4, then bool_a != bool_b, but bool_a xor bool_b is false (because both terms are true). –  dan04 Jun 7 '10 at 12:57
3  
@Mike: x is x is always True. But that does not imply x == x. NaN is defined as not equal to itself. –  dan04 Jun 7 '10 at 13:12
3  
Regarding speed, I though that for checking if a string was modified (e.g. result returned from re.sub) comparing large strings for is equality instead of == would be faster. This was barely the case an timeit showed a mere 0.4% speed improvement. In my case it's not worth the risk that re.sub starts changing the strings in the future. –  estani Oct 30 '12 at 10:56
1  
For anyone looking at this years later, this still holds true for Python 3. –  RyPeck Nov 15 '13 at 22:07

I would like to show a little example on how is and == are involved in immutable types, try that:

a = 19998989890
b = 19998989889 +1
>>> a is b
False
>>> a == b
True

is compares for two objects in memory, == compares their values, for example you can see that small integers are cached by python:

c = 1
b = 1
>>> b is c
True

You should use == when comparing values and is when comparing identities. (also from a english point of view, equals is different from is)

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9  
+1, Good point! –  Gleno Oct 10 '11 at 21:24
2  
Another simple example, datetime.date.today() == datetime.date.today() ==> True but datetime.date.today is datetime.date.today() ==> False because they are equivalent date objects, but they're still different objects. –  Ben Roberts Jun 17 '13 at 21:54
2  
Another dangerous example that your recommendation avoids: str(None) is 'None' evaluates to False but str(None) == 'None' evaluates to True –  hobs Mar 24 at 16:46

See This question

Your logic in reading

For all built-in Python objects (like strings, lists, dicts, functions, etc.), if x is y, then x==y is also True.

is slightly flawed.

If is applies then == will be True, but it does NOT apply in reverse. == may yield True while is yields False.

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Whoops, apparently I forgot how implication works. Thanks. Also, how weird that someone asked such a similar question just as I was writing mine. –  Coquelicot Jun 7 '10 at 8:42
    
is implies == is only necessarily true for built-in types. One can easily write a class where an object does not equal itself. –  Mike Boers Jun 7 '10 at 13:01
5  
@Coquelicot On the universal scale of weird it's about 5 to 5.5 zoolanders. –  Gleno Oct 10 '11 at 21:24
    
@Coquelicot - It's not weird at all. This is a common point of confusion in Python, Python is a popular language, and Stack Overflow is a popular website for asking questions. –  ArtOfWarfare Jul 30 '13 at 19:55

The logic is not flawed. The statement

if x is y then x==y is also True

should never be read to mean

if x==y then x is y

It is a logical error on the part of the reader to assume that the converse of a logic statement is true. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Converse_(logic)

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1  
Not sure why this doesn't have more up votes. –  Brent Hronik Apr 24 at 23:25

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