Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i need following algorithm let say we have 5 //101 and 7 //111 numbers are arbitrary i need to add these numbers using the recursive method and at the same time using bitwise methods such that result should be

101
+
111
 110 0 

or 12 can anybody help me?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Bobby, bensiu, RolandoMySQLDBA, 0x499602D2, The Shift Exchange Jan 22 '13 at 2:35

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Is this homework? If so please add a 'homework' tag. –  Cam Jun 7 '10 at 9:01
    
no not homework –  dato datuashvili Jun 7 '10 at 9:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe something like this is what you're looking for:

static int add(int num1, int num2) {
    if (num1 == 0 && num2 == 0) {
        return 0;
    } else {
        return (num1 & 1) + (num2 & 1)
            + (add(num1 >>> 1, num2 >>> 1) << 1);
    }
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(add(5, 7));   // prints "12"
    System.out.println(add(-3, -4)); // prints "-7"
}

This works by:

  • adding the LSBs of num1 and num2
    • (num1 & 1) + (num2 & 1)
  • and then recursively adding the rest of the bits, with proper shifting involved
    • add(num1 >>> 1, num2 >>> 1)
      • calls add with the numbers shifted to the right
      • >>> unsigned right shift is important here!
    • then shift the result back to the left << 1

We stop when both numbers are 0 (which will happen eventually after enough unsigned right shifts).

Carries will be automatically taken care of, and it works with negatives.

That said, this isn't really the best algorithm to pick to learn about recursion.


An absolutely no + solution

This solution is even more convoluted for learning purposes, but it is recursive, and it uses no +.

static int add(int num1, int num2, int carry) {
    if (num1 == 0 && num2 == 0) {
        return carry;
    } else {
        int lsb1 = (num1 & 1);
        int lsb2 = (num2 & 1);
        int thisBit = lsb1 ^ lsb2 ^ carry;
        int nextCarry =
            (lsb1 == 0 && lsb2 == 1 && carry == 1) ||
            (lsb1 == 1 && lsb2 == 0 && carry == 1) ||
            (lsb1 == 1 && lsb2 == 1 && carry == 0) ||
            (lsb1 == 1 && lsb2 == 1 && carry == 1)
            ? 1 : 0;
        return thisBit | (add(num1 >>> 1, num2 >>> 1, nextCarry) << 1);
    }
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(add(5, 7, 0));   // prints "12"
    System.out.println(add(-3, -4, 0)); // prints "-7"
}

See also

share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't using the + operator kind of cheating? –  Cam Jun 7 '10 at 9:06
    
thanks but i dont need it so learn recursion i wanted itself algorithm –  dato datuashvili Jun 7 '10 at 9:06
    
@incrediman: I'm not sure if the emphasis is on the bit manipulation or in the recursion. –  polygenelubricants Jun 7 '10 at 9:08
1  
@incrediman: Given that the case where (num1 & 1) + (num2 & 1)==2 is not handled, I'd not award this high marks. But it is bitwise recursive, which is all the questions asked for... –  Charles Stewart Jun 7 '10 at 9:18
    
@incrediman, @Charles: added no + solution. –  polygenelubricants Jun 7 '10 at 9:21

In pseudocode:

bint a, b, result;
// from back to front
bit carry = 0;
for(ix = 0; ix < sizeof(bint); ix++) {
    result[ix] = a[ix] ^ b[ix] ^ carry;
    carry = (carry & (a[ix] | b[ix])) | (a[ix] & b[ix]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
in java how write sizeof()? –  dato datuashvili Jun 7 '10 at 9:01
    
also a and b are array? –  dato datuashvili Jun 7 '10 at 9:01

There's always the classic "bitwise operations, recurse as little as possible":

int add (int a , int b)
{
   if (a&b) { /* At least one bit in common */
      return add(a^b, (a&b) << 1); /* Return addition of "no-carry" and "carry" bits */
   } else { /* No bits in common */
      return a|b;
   }
}

This will, I believe, lead to the smallest number of recursive calls.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.