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Have a quick question about what would be the best way to implement iterators in the following:

Say I have a templated base class 'List' and two subclasses "ListImpl1" and "ListImpl2". The basic requirement of the base class is to be iterable i.e. I can do:

for(List<T>::iterator it = list->begin(); it != list->end(); it++){
   ...
}

I also want to allow iterator addition e.g.:

for(List<T>::iterator it = list->begin()+5; it != list->end(); it++){
   ...
}

So the problem is that the implementation of the iterator for ListImpl1 will be different to that for ListImpl2. I got around this by using a wrapper ListIterator containing a pointer to a ListIteratorImpl with subclasses ListIteratorImpl2 and ListIteratorImpl2, but it's all getting pretty messy, especially when you need to implement operator+ in the ListIterator.

Any thoughts on a better design to get around these issues?

share|improve this question
    
Why not use std::advance? –  kennytm Jun 7 '10 at 12:02
    
Thanks, but say I need to I want to provide a more efficient operator+ than just using operator++ repeatedly. Presumably I still have the same problem? –  user360366 Jun 7 '10 at 12:11
    
The distinction between a forward iterator (what std::advance() is for) and a random access iterator is that a forward iterator does not have an efficient operator+ implementation (think linked list). This question implies an iterator which is statically random access, but which has dynamic behavior for that access. –  Simon Buchan Jun 7 '10 at 12:42
    
That's correct - I would like dynamic behaviour for the random access. I don't see why that would be a problem? –  user360366 Jun 18 '10 at 11:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you can get away with making List<T>::iterator non-virtual, then delegating the virtualness off add to List makes things simple:

template<typename T>
class List
{
    virtual void add_assign(iterator& left, int right) = 0;

public:
    class iterator
    {
        const List* list;
        const T* item;
    public:
        iterator(const List* list, const T* item) : list(list), item(item) {}

        iterator& operator +=(int right)
        {
            list->add_assign(*this, right);
            return *this;
        }
        static iterator operator +(iterator const& left, int right)
        {
            iterator result = left;
            result += right;
            return result;
        }
    };

    virtual iterator begin() const = 0;
    virtual iterator end() const = 0;
};

Otherwise (if the iterators need to store significantly different data, for example), then you have to do the regular, boring pointer-to-implementation to get your virtualness:

template<typename T>
class List
{
    class ItImpl
    {
        virtual ItImpl* clone() = 0;
        virtual void increment() = 0;
        virtual void add(int right) = 0;
    };
public:
    class iterator
    {
        ItImpl* impl;
    public:
        // Boring memory management stuff.
        iterator() : impl() {}
        iterator(ItImpl* impl) : impl(impl) {}
        iterator(iterator const& right) : impl(right.impl->clone()) {}
        ~iterator() { delete impl; }
        iterator& operator=(iterator const& right)
        {
            delete impl;
            impl = right.impl->clone();
            return *this;
        }

        // forward operators to virtual calls through impl.
        iterator& operator+=(int right)
        {
            impl->add(right);
            return *this;
        }
        iterator& operator++()
        {
            impl->increment();
            return *this;
        }
    };
};

template<typename T>
static List<T>::iterator operator+(List<T>::iterator const& left, int right)
{
    List<T>::iterator result = left;
    result += right;
    return result;
}

template<typename T>
class MagicList : public List<T>
{
    class MagicItImpl : public ItImpl
    {
        const MagicList* list;
        const magic* the_magic;
        // implement ...
    };
public:
    iterator begin() const { return iterator(new MagicItImpl(this, begin_magic)); }
    iterator end() const { return iterator(new MagicItImpl(this, end_magic)); }
};
share|improve this answer

So the problem is that the implementation of the iterator for ListImpl1 will be different to that for ListImpl2. I got around this by using a wrapper ListIterator containing a pointer to a ListIteratorImpl with subclasses ListIteratorImpl2 and ListIteratorImpl2, but it's all getting pretty messy, especially when you need to implement operator+ in the ListIterator.

This design is fine IMHO, I can't see anything messy about it. Except for equality and subtraction, operations of the iterator can be implemented by virtual function pretty easily, so you'll have something like

class ListIteratorInterface // abstract
{
protected:
  virtual Data& operator*()=0;
  // and other operations
};
class ListIteratorA;
class ListIteratorB; // implementation of the above
class ListIterator
{
  ListIteratorInterface* impl_;
public:
  // when you create this, allocate impl_ on the heap
  // operations, forward anything to impl_
};
share|improve this answer
    
That's pretty much what I have at the moment. Where it gets more messy is the implementation of operator+ in the ListIterator class. Because I need to return a new ListIterator and ListIteratorA/B, I guess I need to create a virtual clone() method in the ListIteratorInterface to create a new impl of the correct type. –  user360366 Jun 7 '10 at 12:17

You could store operator+ as a private virtual method in the base class, and have the iterator call that.

Alternatively, you could consider statically polymorphic list classes, rather than runtime polymorphism.

share|improve this answer

Say I have a templated base class 'List' and two subclasses "ListImpl1" and "ListImpl2"

What exactly do you gain by using inheritance here?

share|improve this answer
    
Just for polymorphism –  user360366 Jun 14 '10 at 11:52
    
@jom: There are different kinds of polymorphism. The STL containers are based on "compile time polymorphism / static binding / genericity / templates", not the kind of polymorphism you seem to have in mind. –  FredOverflow Jun 14 '10 at 15:37
    
I'm talking about run-time polymorphism i.e. using List<T> is an interface with multiple implementations ListImpl1<T> and ListImpl2<T>, transparent to client code, although obviously there is static polymorphism here too. –  user360366 Jun 18 '10 at 11:19

There is something very important among iterators, called Iterator Category:

  • InputIterator
  • OutputIterator
  • ForwardIterator
  • BidirectionalIterator
  • RandomAccessIterator

Each category define an exact set of operations that are supported, efficiently, by the iterator.

Here, it seems you wish to turn down that powerful identification mechanism to create some kind of bastard category in which the operations are all present, but no guarantee is made on their efficiency.

I think your design smells.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't really see what you mean. It's just a random access iterator guaranteeing constant time. –  user360366 Jun 14 '10 at 11:56
    
Then operator+ should be part of the interface (accepting a signed integer as its right hand side argument). What is your issue ? –  Matthieu M. Jun 14 '10 at 17:57
    
The problem is that operator+ is returning an iterator, but iterator implementation is different in the two subclasses, so you have to hide this implementation away inside a 'wrapper' iterator. My question was whether there is a better way of doing this. –  user360366 Jun 18 '10 at 11:24
    
It can be done easily: a pimpl class iterator, containing a pointer to a dynamically allocated object derived from an iterator_interface class (featuring a clone method). It means 2 classes + 1 per implementation. –  Matthieu M. Jun 18 '10 at 12:50
    
That's the solution from the original post. I was just wondering if someone could suggest something cleaner, but the consensus seems to be that this is an OK way to get the result. –  user360366 Jun 21 '10 at 11:44

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