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Am trying to create a well-optimised bit of code to create number of X-digits in length (where X is read from a runtime properties file), based on a DB-generated sequence number (Y), which is then used a folder-name when saving a file.

I've come up with three ideas so far, the fastest of which is the last one, but I'd appreciate any advice people may have on this...

1) Instantiate a StringBuilder with initial capacity X. Append Y. While length < X, insert a zero at pos zero.

2) Instantiate a StringBuilder with initial capacity X. While length < X, append a zero. Create a DecimalFormat based on StringBuilder value, and then format the number when it's needed.

3) Create a new int of Math.pow( 10, X ) and add Y. Use String.valueOf() on the new number and then substring(1) it.

The second one can obviously be split into outside-loop and inside-loop sections.

So, any tips? Using a for-loop of 10,000 iterations, I'm getting similar timings from the first two, and the third method is approximately ten-times faster. Does this seem correct?

Full test-method code below...

    // Setup test variables
    int numDigits = 9;
    int testNumber = 724;
    int numIterations = 10000;
    String folderHolder = null;
    DecimalFormat outputFormat = new DecimalFormat( "#,##0" );

    // StringBuilder test
    long before = System.nanoTime();
    for ( int i = 0; i < numIterations; i++ )
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder( numDigits );
        sb.append( testNumber );
        while ( sb.length() < numDigits )
        {
            sb.insert( 0, 0 );
        }

        folderHolder = sb.toString();
    }
    long after = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println( "01: " + outputFormat.format( after - before ) + " nanoseconds" );
    System.out.println( "Sanity check: Folder = \"" + folderHolder + "\"" );

    // DecimalFormat test
    before = System.nanoTime();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder( numDigits );
    while ( sb.length() < numDigits )
    {
        sb.append( 0 );
    }
    DecimalFormat formatter = new DecimalFormat( sb.toString() );
    for ( int i = 0; i < numIterations; i++ )
    {
        folderHolder = formatter.format( testNumber );
    }
    after = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println( "02: " + outputFormat.format( after - before ) + " nanoseconds" );
    System.out.println( "Sanity check: Folder = \"" + folderHolder + "\"" );

    // Substring test
    before = System.nanoTime();
    int baseNum = (int)Math.pow( 10, numDigits );
    for ( int i = 0; i < numIterations; i++ )
    {
        int newNum = baseNum + testNumber;
        folderHolder = String.valueOf( newNum ).substring( 1 );
    }
    after = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println( "03: " + outputFormat.format( after - before ) + " nanoseconds" );
    System.out.println( "Sanity check: Folder = \"" + folderHolder + "\"" );
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2  
Be cautious with microbenchmarking the JVM: java.sun.com/docs/hotspot/HotSpotFAQ.html#benchmarking_simple –  BalusC Jun 7 '10 at 13:07
2  
Your code is accessing the harddisk, and you're worrying about the performance of string formatting for filename generation? Seriously? –  Michael Borgwardt Jun 7 '10 at 14:17
    
Actually, it's going to be using GPFS via WebDAV and/or Amazon S3. I'm simply trying to optimise everything I can, while I'm building the thing. Plus, this has become an academic exercise for me as well now! –  Martin Jun 7 '10 at 14:24
5  
An academic exercise in how much time you can waste on the evils of premature optimization? Seriously, this is really, really, pointless. IF you're going over the network, it*s probably even more irrelevant than if you're writing to HD. –  Michael Borgwardt Jun 7 '10 at 14:31
    
Premature optimization is usually going to harm your architecture... you may produce fast software, but it may be unmaintainable and impossible to understand... Start building the thing architecturally sane, then optimize if you see a need for it. –  Erk Feb 25 at 22:45
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would stop doing optimizations based on micro-benchmarks and go for something that looks elegant codewise, such as String.format("%0"+numDigits+"d", testNumber)

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1  
That all makes sense, but it's WAY slower according to the micro-benchmarking. Is that stuff really useless, because I'm getting results that suggest the String.format is 100 times slower than substringing an int. Does it have no usefulness at all? –  Martin Jun 7 '10 at 13:25
2  
You should be careful when interpreting figures from micro-benchmarks. In some situations the compiler/JIT compiler optimize away large chunks of code if it realizes that it's unnecessary. It's quite obvious for instance, that (in the third case) newNum will stay the same in all iterations. This could in turn potentially cause String.valueOf(newNum).substring(1); to be put outside of the loop, which havocs the entire bench-mark. –  aioobe Jun 7 '10 at 13:39
2  
Try adding the actual creation of the folder (of name folderHolder) to each iteration. Do you get the same percentual difference between the tests? Or is the computation of the folder-name negligible? –  aioobe Jun 7 '10 at 14:07
3  
@Martin: You say you are using this routine to generate a file or directory name. If you consider the time required for the disk access, how important do you really think it is to "optimize" this part of your code? –  jarnbjo Jun 7 '10 at 14:15
1  
I believe the time it takes to execute a String.format call, is negligible in comparison. My suggestion: Go for the cleanest and most readable code. –  aioobe Jun 7 '10 at 15:54
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Inserting padding characters one by one is obviously slow. If performance is really that big a concern, you could use predefined string constants of lengts 1..n-1 instead (where n is the biggest expected length), stored in an ArrayList at the corresponding indexes.

If n is very big, at least you could still insert in bigger chunks instead of single chars.

But overall, as others pointed out too, optimization is only feasible if you have profiled your application under real circumstances and found which specific piece of code is the bottleneck. Then you can focus on that (and of course profile again to verify that your changes actually improve performance).

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Use String.format("%0[length]d", i)

For length of 8 it would be

String out = String.format("%08d", i);

It's slower, but the time spent typing and debugging the more complex code will probably exceed the total extra time ever used during execution.

In fact, if you add up all the man-hours already spent discussing this, It most likely exceeds the execution time savings by a large factor.

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Here is a solution that is basically the same thing as your StringBuilder with two optimizations:

  1. It directly writes to an array bypassing the StringBuilder overhead
  2. It does the operations in reverse instead of insert(0), which requries an arraycopy each time

It also makes the assumptions that numDigits will be >= to the actual characters required, but will properly handle negative numbers:

before = System.nanoTime();
String arrString=null;
for ( int j = 0; j < numIterations; j++ ){
  char[] arrNum = new char[numDigits];
  int i = numDigits-1;
  boolean neg = testNumber<0;
  for(int tmp = neg?-testNumber:testNumber;tmp>0;tmp/=10){
    arrNum[i--] = (char)((tmp%10)+48);
  }
  while(i>=0){
    arrNum[i--]='0';
  }
  if(neg)arrNum[0]='-';
  arrString = new String(arrNum);
}
after = System.nanoTime();
System.out.println( "04: " + outputFormat.format( after - before ) + " nanoseconds" );
System.out.println( "Sanity check: Folder = \"" + arrString + "\"" );

This method well outperformed your samples on my machine for negatives and was comparable for positives:

01: 18,090,933 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "000000742"
02: 22,659,205 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "000000742"
03: 2,309,949 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "000000742"
04: 6,380,892 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "000000742"

01: 14,933,369 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "0000-2745"
02: 21,685,158 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "-000002745"
03: 3,213,270 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "99997255"
04: 1,255,660 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "-00002745"

Edit: I noticed your tests resued some of the objects within the iteration loop, which I had not done in mine (such as not recalculating baseNum in the substring version). When I altered the tests to be consistent (not resuing any objects / calculations my version performed better than yours:

01: 18,377,935 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "000000742"
02: 69,443,911 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "000000742"
03: 6,410,263 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "000000742"
04: 996,622 nanoseconds
Sanity check: Folder = "000000742"

Of course as others have mentioned micro benchmarking is incredibly difficult / "fudgy" with all of the optimization performed by the VM and the inability to control them.

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This probably related link discusses many of the ways to do it. I would recommend the Apache option, StringUtils, it may or may not be the absolute fastest, but its usually one of the easiest to understand, and has had the )&##@ pounded out of it, so it probably won't break in some unforeseen edge case. ;)

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