Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying out Castle ActiveRecord. I want to use the Validation features AND the LINQ features.

In order to use LINQ, you can either:

  1. My preference: Make your entities inherit from ActiveRecordLinqBase<T>, then to query:

    var blogs = (from b in Blog.Queryable select b).ToList();

  2. Use ActiveRecordLinq.AsQueryable<T>, e.g.:

    var blogs = (from b in ActiveRecordLinq.AsQueryable() select b).ToList()

Now, to use the validation features, you have to make your entities inherit from ActiveRecordValidationBase<T>.

Multiple inheritance isn't supported so, here's my options:

  1. Use #2 from above while making my entities inherit from ActiveRecordValidationBase<T>. Disadvantage: LINQ statements are longer and uglier.
  2. Create a class that inherits from ActiveRecordLinqBase<T> and duplicates the code found in ActiveRecordValidationBase<T>. Disadvantage: Duplicate code, which must be updated with future ActiveRecord releases. Here's the class:

Edit: 3. (Not Tested) Simulate multiple inheritance. Disadvantage: Have to keep Property and Method Definitions in sync with updates.

 

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Xml.Serialization;
using Castle.ActiveRecord.Framework;
using Castle.Components.Validator;
using NHibernate.Type;

namespace Castle.ActiveRecord.Linq
{
    [Serializable]
    public abstract class ActiveRecordValidationLinqBase<T> : ActiveRecordLinqBase<T>, IValidationProvider where T : class
    {
        // Fields
        [NonSerialized]
        private IValidationProvider _actualValidator;

        // Methods
        protected ActiveRecordValidationLinqBase() { }

        protected override bool BeforeSave(IDictionary state)
        {
            if (!this.IsValid(RunWhen.Insert))
            {
                this.OnNotValid();
            }
            return base.BeforeSave(state);
        }

        public virtual bool IsValid()
        {
            return this.ActualValidator.IsValid();
        }

        public virtual bool IsValid(RunWhen runWhen)
        {
            return this.ActualValidator.IsValid(runWhen);
        }

        protected override bool OnFlushDirty(object id, IDictionary previousState, IDictionary currentState, IType[] types)
        {
            if (!this.IsValid(RunWhen.Update))
            {
                this.OnNotValid();
            }
            return base.OnFlushDirty(id, previousState, currentState, types);
        }

        protected virtual void OnNotValid()
        {
            ActiveRecordValidator.ThrowNotValidException(this.ValidationErrorMessages, this.PropertiesValidationErrorMessages);
        }

        // Properties
        [XmlIgnore]
        protected virtual IValidationProvider ActualValidator
        {
            get
            {
                if (this._actualValidator == null)
                {
                    this._actualValidator = new ActiveRecordValidator(this);
                }
                return this._actualValidator;
            }
        }

        [XmlIgnore]
        public virtual IDictionary PropertiesValidationErrorMessages
        {
            get
            {
                return this.ActualValidator.PropertiesValidationErrorMessages;
            }
        }

        public virtual string[] ValidationErrorMessages
        {
            get
            {
                return this.ActualValidator.ValidationErrorMessages;
            }
        }
    }
}

Is there a better way?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

to use the validation features, you have to make your entities inherit from ActiveRecordValidationBase.

Not necessarily. Validation is a separate Castle project, it's not very tightly coupled to ActiveRecord. You can run the validation manually. By manually I mean wrapping this in your own repository/DAO class.

And since it's loosely coupled you could even choose any other validation framework.

Personally, I don't consider ActiveRecordLinq<Blog>.AsQueryable() to be much longer or uglier than Blog.Queryable so I'd go with that option.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.