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Seeing as C# can't switch on a Type (which I gather wasn't added as a special case because is-a relationships mean that more than one distinct case might apply), is there a better way to simulate switching on type than this?

void Foo(object o)
{
    if (o is A)
    {
        ((A)o).Hop();
    }
    else if (o is B)
    {
        ((B)o).Skip();
    }
    else
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Unexpected type: " + o.GetType());
    }
}
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18 Answers

up vote 133 down vote accepted

Switching on types is definitely lacking in C#. In order to do this without a large if/else if/else statement, you'll need to work with a different structure. I wrote a blog post awhile back detailing how to build a TypeSwitch structure.

http://blogs.msdn.com/jaredpar/archive/2008/05/16/switching-on-types.aspx

Short version: TypeSwitch is designed to prevent redundant casting and give a syntax that is similar to a normal switch/case statement. For example, here is TypeSwitch in action on a standard Windows form event

TypeSwitch.Do(
    sender,
    TypeSwitch.Case<Button>(() => textBox1.Text = "Hit a Button"),
    TypeSwitch.Case<CheckBox>(x => textBox1.Text = "Checkbox is " + x.Checked),
    TypeSwitch.Default(() => textBox1.Text = "Not sure what is hovered over"));

The code for TypeSwitch is actually pretty small and can easily be put into your project.

static class TypeSwitch {
    public class CaseInfo {
        public bool IsDefault { get; set; }
        public Type Target { get; set; }
        public Action<object> Action { get; set; }
    }

    public static void Do(object source, params CaseInfo[] cases) {
        var type = source.GetType();
        foreach (var entry in cases) {
            if (entry.IsDefault || entry.Target.IsAssignableFrom(type)) {
                entry.Action(source);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    public static CaseInfo Case<T>(Action action) {
        return new CaseInfo() {
            Action = x => action(),
            Target = typeof(T)
        };
    }

    public static CaseInfo Case<T>(Action<T> action) {
        return new CaseInfo() {
            Action = (x) => action((T)x),
            Target = typeof(T)
        };
    }

    public static CaseInfo Default(Action action) {
        return new CaseInfo() {
            Action = x => action(),
            IsDefault = true
        };
    }
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13  
"type == entry.Target" can also be changed to "entry.Target.IsAssignableFrom(type)" to take compatible types (e.g., subclasses) into account. –  Mark Cidade Nov 18 '08 at 16:46
    
@marxidad: Excellent point. –  Zachary Yates Nov 21 '08 at 14:33
    
+1. This great and solves a real problem for me! –  Marcel May 14 '10 at 9:25
    
Altered the code to use "entry.Target.IsAssignableFrom(type)" so that subclasses are supported. –  Matt Howells Feb 6 '12 at 15:31
2  
One thing maybe worth noting is that (from what I understand) it is required to specify the 'default' action last to ensure all other cases are checked. I believe this is not a requirement in a standard switch - not that I have ever seen anybody try to plant a 'default' anywhere other than the bottom anyway. A couple of fail safe options for this could be to order the array to ensure default is last (bit wasteful) or pop the default in a variable to be processed after the foreach (which would only ever happen if a match wasn't found) –  musefan Aug 14 '12 at 7:59
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One option is to have a dictionary from Type to Action (or some other delegate). Look up the action based on the type, and then execute it. I've used this for factories before now.

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17  
Minor note: good for 1:1 matches, but might be a pain with inheritance and/or interfaces - especially as order isn't guaranteed to be preserved with a dictionary. But still, it is the way I do it in a fair few places ;-p So +1 –  Marc Gravell Nov 18 '08 at 15:34
3  
+1 for Marc's comment :) –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '08 at 15:41
2  
I've used this technique alot in the past, usually before moving to an IoC Container –  Chris Canal Nov 18 '08 at 16:00
3  
This technique breaks down for inheritance and interfaces because you need a one-to-one correspondence between the object you're checking and the delegate you're calling. Which of an object's multiple interfaces should you try to find in the dictionary? –  Robert Rossney Nov 18 '08 at 18:38
5  
If you're building a dictionary specifically for this purpose you could overload the indexer to return the key type's value, or if missing then its superclass, if that's missing then that superclass, etc., until there's nothing left. –  Erik Forbes Feb 4 '09 at 23:26
show 3 more comments

You could switch on the type name

switch(o.GetType().Name)
{
  case "AType":
    break;
}

Just a thought, hope it helps!

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15  
Worth noting that this isn't particularly refactor friendly. –  nukefusion Feb 22 '12 at 13:56
1  
does this work with case typeof(string).Name: ... or it has to be with Valuetype? –  Tomer W Jun 12 '12 at 8:47
    
@TomerW it works with any type –  Zachary Yates Jul 9 '12 at 15:08
    
Obfuscation can break it –  Konrad Morawski Mar 18 at 21:28
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With JaredPar's answer in the back of my head, I wrote a variant of his TypeSwitch class that uses type inference for a nicer syntax:

class A { string Name { get; } }
class B : A { string LongName { get; } }
class C : A { string FullName { get; } }
class X { public string ToString(IFormatProvider provider); }
class Y { public string GetIdentifier(); }

public string GetName(object value)
{
    string name = null;
    TypeSwitch.On(value)
        .Case((C x) => name = x.FullName)
        .Case((B x) => name = x.LongName)
        .Case((A x) => name = x.Name)
        .Case((X x) => name = x.ToString(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture))
        .Case((Y x) => name = x.GetIdentifier())
        .Default((x) => name = x.ToString());
    return name;
}

Note that the order of the Case() methods is important.

Get the full and commented code for my TypeSwitch class. This is a working abbreviated version:

public static class TypeSwitch
{
    public static Switch<TSource> On<TSource>(TSource value)
    {
        return new Switch<TSource>(value);
    }

    public class Switch<TSource>
    {
        private TSource value;
        private bool handled = false;

        internal Switch(TSource value)
        {
            this.value = value;
        }

        public Switch<TSource> Case<TTarget>(Action<TTarget> action)
            where TTarget : TSource
        {
            if (!handled)
            {
                var sourceType = value.GetType();
                var targetType = typeof(TTarget);
                if (targetType.IsAssignableFrom(sourceType))
                {
                    action((TTarget)value);
                    handled = true;
                }
            }

            return this;
        }

        public void Default(Action<TSource> action)
        {
            if (!handled)
                action(value);
        }
    }
}
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Looks like a good solution and wanted to see what else you had to say about it but blog is dead. –  Wes Grant Jun 27 '12 at 0:58
1  
Darn, you are right. My webhost is having some issues since an hour. They're working on it. The post on my blog is essentially the same as the answer here, but with a link to the full source code. –  Virtlink Jun 27 '12 at 1:36
    
Awsome, seems to be back up again. –  Wes Grant Jun 27 '12 at 14:21
1  
@Downvoter: Why the downvote? –  Virtlink Jun 28 '12 at 10:53
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Create a superclass (S) and make A and B inherit from it. Then declare an abstract method on S that every subclass needs to implement.

Doing this the "foo" method can also change its signature to Foo(S o), making it type safe, and you don't need to throw that ugly exception.

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This only works if A and B are "custom" types ... –  bruno conde Nov 18 '08 at 15:23
    
True bruno, but the question doesn't suggest that. You could include that in your answer though Pablo. –  Dana the Sane Nov 18 '08 at 15:28
    
From the question I think A and B are generic enough that they can be A = String ; B = List<int> for instance ... –  bruno conde Nov 18 '08 at 15:35
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You should really be overloading your method, not trying to do the disambiguation yourself. Most of the answers so far don't take future subclasses into account, which may lead to really terrible maintenance issues later on.

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1  
Overload resolution is determined statically so that just won't work at all. –  Neutrino Jun 10 '13 at 19:18
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If you were using C# 4, you could make use of the new dynamic functionality to achieve an interesting alternative. I'm not saying this is better, in fact it seems very likely that it would be slower, but it does have a certain elegance to it.

class Thing
{

  void Foo(A a)
  {
     a.Hop();
  }

  void Foo(B b)
  {
     b.Skip();
  }

}

And the usage:

object aOrB = Get_AOrB();
Thing t = GetThing();
((dynamic)t).Foo(aorB);

The reason this works is that a C# 4 dynamic method invocation has its overloads resolved at runtime rather than compile time. I wrote a little more about this idea quite recently. Again, I would just like to reiterate that this probably performs worse than all the other suggestions, I am offering it simply as a curiosity.

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I had the same idea today. It's roughly 3 times slower than switching on the type name. Of course slower is relative ( for 60,000,000 calls, only 4 seconds. ), and the code is so much more readable it's well worth it. –  Daryl Nov 21 '13 at 15:24
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Just for the record, in case someone finds this question from Google like I just did, I think it could lead to ambiguousity to have a switch on types, because of inheritance, which makes possible for a variable to be of two different types. For example:

{
  string s = "a";
  if (s is string) Print("Foo");
  else if (s is object) Print("Bar");
}

does not do the same than

{
  string s = "a";
  if (s is object) Print("Foo");
  else if (s is string) Print("Bar");
}

Because s is a string and an object. I think when you write a switch(foo) you expect foo to match one and only one of the case statements. With a switch on types, the order in which you write your case statements could possibly change the result of the whole switch statement. I think that would be wrong.

You could think of a compiler-check on the types of a "typeswitch" statement, checking that the enumerated types do not inherit from each other. That doesn't exist though.

foo is T is not the same as foo.GetType() == typeof(T)!!

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I would either

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I looked at a few options here, mirroring what F# can do. F# has much better support for type-based switching (although I'm still sticking to C# ;-p). You might want to see here and here.

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I such cases I usually end up with a list of predicates and actions. Something along these lines:

class Mine {
  static List<Func<object, bool>> predicates;
  static List<Action<object>> actions;

  static Mine() {
    AddAction<A>(o => o.Hop());
    AddAction<B>(o => o.Skip());
  }

  static void AddAction<T>(Action<T> action) {
    predicates.Add(o => o is T);
    actions.Add(o => action((T)o);
  }

  static void RunAction(object o) {
    for (int i=0; o < predicates.Count; i++) {
      if (predicates[i](o)) {
        actions[i](o);
        break;
      }
    }
  }

  void Foo(object o) {
    RunAction(o);
  }
}
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Create an interface IFooable, then make your A and B classes to implement a common method, which in turn calls the corresponding method you want:

interface IFooable
{
   public void Foo();
}

class A : IFooable
{
   //other methods ...

   public void Foo()
   {
      this.Hop();
   }
}

class B : IFooable
{
   //other methods ...

   public void Foo()
   {
      this.Skip();
   }
}

class ProcessingClass
{
public void Foo(object o)
{
   if (o == null)
      throw new NullRefferenceException("Null reference", "o");

   IFooable f = o as IFooable;
   if (f != null)
   {
       f.Foo();
   }
   else
   {
       throw new ArgumentException("Unexpected type: " + o.GetType());
   }
}
}

Note, that it's better to use "as" instead first checking with "is" and then casting, as that way you make 2 casts (expensive).

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Another way would be to define an interface IThing and then implement it in both classes here's the snipet:

public interface IThing
{
    void Move();
}

public class ThingA : IThing
{
    public void Move()
    {
    	Hop();
    }

    public void Hop(){	
    	//Implementation of Hop	
    }

}

public class ThingA : IThing
{
    public void Move()
    {
    	Skip();
    }

    public void Skip(){	
    	//Implementation of Skip	
    }

}

public class Foo
{
    static void Main(String[] args)
    {

    }

    private void Foo(IThing a)
    {
        a.Move();
    }
}
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I liked Virtlink's use of implicit typing to make the switch much more readable, but I didn't like that an early-out isn't possible, and that we're doing allocations. Let's turn up the perf a little.

public static class TypeSwitch
{
    public static void On<TV, T1>(TV value, Action<T1> action1)
        where T1 : TV
    {
        if (value is T1) action1((T1)value);
    }

    public static void On<TV, T1, T2>(TV value, Action<T1> action1, Action<T2> action2)
        where T1 : TV where T2 : TV
    {
        if (value is T1) action1((T1)value);
        else if (value is T2) action2((T2)value);
    }

    public static void On<TV, T1, T2, T3>(TV value, Action<T1> action1, Action<T2> action2, Action<T3> action3)
        where T1 : TV where T2 : TV where T3 : TV
    {
        if (value is T1) action1((T1)value);
        else if (value is T2) action2((T2)value);
        else if (value is T3) action3((T3)value);
    }

    // ... etc.
}

Well, that makes my fingers hurt. Let's do it in T4:

<#@ template debug="false" hostSpecific="true" language="C#" #>
<#@ output extension=".cs" #>
<#@ Assembly Name="System.Core.dll" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Linq" #> 
<#@ import namespace="System.IO" #> 
<#
    string GenWarning = "// THIS FILE IS GENERATED FROM " + Path.GetFileName(Host.TemplateFile) + " - ANY HAND EDITS WILL BE LOST!";
    const int MaxCases = 15;
#>
<#=GenWarning#>

using System;

public static class TypeSwitch
{
<# for(int icase = 1; icase <= MaxCases; ++icase) {
    var types = string.Join(", ", Enumerable.Range(1, icase).Select(i => "T" + i));
    var actions = string.Join(", ", Enumerable.Range(1, icase).Select(i => string.Format("Action<T{0}> action{0}", i)));
    var wheres = string.Join(" ", Enumerable.Range(1, icase).Select(i => string.Format("where T{0} : TV", i)));
#>
    <#=GenWarning#>

    public static void On<TV, <#=types#>>(TV value, <#=actions#>)
        <#=wheres#>
    {
        if (value is T1) action1((T1)value);
<# for(int i = 2; i <= icase; ++i) { #>
        else if (value is T<#=i#>) action<#=i#>((T<#=i#>)value);
<#}#>
    }

<#}#>
    <#=GenWarning#>
}

Adjusting Virtlink's example a little:

TypeSwitch.On(operand,
    (C x) => name = x.FullName,
    (B x) => name = x.LongName,
    (A x) => name = x.Name,
    (X x) => name = x.ToString(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture),
    (Y x) => name = x.GetIdentifier(),
    (object x) => name = x.ToString());

Readable and fast. Now, as everybody keeps pointing out in their answers, and given the nature of this question, order is important in the type matching. Therefore:

  • Put leaf types first, base types later.
  • For peer types, put more likely matches first to maximize perf.
  • This implies that there is no need for a special default case. Instead, just use the base-most type in the lambda, and put it last.
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1  
+1 for a T4 template. –  pms1969 Aug 16 '13 at 10:58
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For built-in types, you can use the TypeCode enumeration. Please note that GetType() is kind of slow, but probably not relevant in most situations.

switch (Type.GetTypeCode(someObject.GetType()))
{
    case TypeCode.Boolean:
        break;
    case TypeCode.Byte:
        break;
    case TypeCode.Char:
        break;
}

For custom types, you can create your own enumeration, and either an interface or a base class with abstract property or method...

Abstract class implementation of property

public enum FooTypes { FooFighter, AbbreviatedFool, Fubar, Fugu };
public abstract class Foo
{
    public abstract FooTypes FooType { get; }
}
public class FooFighter : Foo
{
    public override FooTypes FooType { get { return FooTypes.FooFighter; } }
}

Abstract class implementation of method

public enum FooTypes { FooFighter, AbbreviatedFool, Fubar, Fugu };
public abstract class Foo
{
    public abstract FooTypes GetFooType();
}
public class FooFighter : Foo
{
    public override FooTypes GetFooType() { return FooTypes.FooFighter; }
}

Interface implementation of property

public enum FooTypes { FooFighter, AbbreviatedFool, Fubar, Fugu };
public interface IFooType
{
    FooTypes FooType { get; }
}
public class FooFighter : IFooType
{
    public FooTypes FooType { get { return FooTypes.FooFighter; } }
}

Interface implementation of method

public enum FooTypes { FooFighter, AbbreviatedFool, Fubar, Fugu };
public interface IFooType
{
    FooTypes GetFooType();
}
public class FooFighter : IFooType
{
    public FooTypes GetFooType() { return FooTypes.FooFighter; }
}

One of my coworkers just told me about this too: This has the advantage that you can use it for literally any type of object, not just ones that you define. It has the disadvantage of being a bit larger and slower.

First define a static class like this:

public static class TypeEnumerator
{
    public class TypeEnumeratorException : Exception
    {
        public Type unknownType { get; private set; }
        public TypeEnumeratorException(Type unknownType) : base()
        {
            this.unknownType = unknownType;
        }
    }
    public enum TypeEnumeratorTypes { _int, _string, _Foo, _TcpClient, };
    private static Dictionary<Type, TypeEnumeratorTypes> typeDict;
    static TypeEnumerator()
    {
        typeDict = new Dictionary<Type, TypeEnumeratorTypes>();
        typeDict[typeof(int)] = TypeEnumeratorTypes._int;
        typeDict[typeof(string)] = TypeEnumeratorTypes._string;
        typeDict[typeof(Foo)] = TypeEnumeratorTypes._Foo;
        typeDict[typeof(System.Net.Sockets.TcpClient)] = TypeEnumeratorTypes._TcpClient;
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// Throws NullReferenceException and TypeEnumeratorException</summary>
    /// <exception cref="System.NullReferenceException">NullReferenceException</exception>
    /// <exception cref="MyProject.TypeEnumerator.TypeEnumeratorException">TypeEnumeratorException</exception>
    public static TypeEnumeratorTypes EnumerateType(object theObject)
    {
        try
        {
            return typeDict[theObject.GetType()];
        }
        catch (KeyNotFoundException)
        {
            throw new TypeEnumeratorException(theObject.GetType());
        }
    }
}

And then you can use it like this:

switch (TypeEnumerator.EnumerateType(someObject))
{
    case TypeEnumerator.TypeEnumeratorTypes._int:
        break;
    case TypeEnumerator.TypeEnumeratorTypes._string:
        break;
}
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I agree with Jon about having a hash of actions to class name. If you keep your pattern, you might want to consider using the "as" construct instead:

A a = o as A;
if (a != null) {
    a.Hop();
    return;
}
B b = o as B;
if (b != null) {
    b.Skip();
    return;
}
throw new ArgumentException("...");

The difference is that when you use the patter if (foo is Bar) { ((Bar)foo).Action(); } you're doing the type casting twice. Now maybe the compiler will optimize and only do that work once - but I wouldn't count on it.

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1  
I really not like multiple exit points (returns), but if you want to stick with this, add "if (o == null) throw" in the beginning, as later on you will not know if the cast is unsuccessful, or the object was null. –  Sunny Milenov Nov 18 '08 at 15:29
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You can create overloaded methods:

void Foo(A a) 
{ 
   a.Hop(); 
}

void Foo(B b) 
{ 
   b.Skip(); 
}

void Foo(object o) 
{ 
   throw new ArgumentException("Unexpected type: " + o.GetType()); 
}

And use dynamic parameter type to bypass static type checking:

Foo((dynamic)something);
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As Pablo suggests, interface approach is almost always the right thing to do to handle this. To really utilize switch, another alternative is to have a custom enum denoting your type in your classes.

enum ObjectType { A, B, Default }

interface IIdentifiable
{
    ObjectType Type { get; };
}
class A : IIdentifiable
{
    public ObjectType Type { get { return ObjectType.A; } }
}

class B : IIdentifiable
{
    public ObjectType Type { get { return ObjectType.B; } }
}

void Foo(IIdentifiable o)
{
    switch (o.Type)
    {
        case ObjectType.A:
        case ObjectType.B:
        //......
    }
}

This is kind of implemented in BCL too. One example is MemberInfo.MemberTypes, another is GetTypeCode for primitive types, like:

void Foo(object o)
{
    switch (Type.GetTypeCode(o.GetType())) // for IConvertible, just o.GetTypeCode()
    {
        case TypeCode.Int16:
        case TypeCode.Int32:
        //etc ......
    }
}
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