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I have the following structure in Python:

letters = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['p', 'q', 'r', 's'], ['j', 'k', 'l']]

I would like to find all the possible combinations of letters in the order that they currently exist. For the example above this would be:

apj
apk
apl
aqj
aqk
aql
...
csk
csl

This seems like it should be a very simple thing to do but I cannot figure it out.

share|improve this question
    
Can we assume that the values are already ordered within the individual lists? – wcm Jun 7 '10 at 13:49
    
What version of Python are you using? – Mark Byers Jun 7 '10 at 13:52
    
@wcm: No, the values in the individual lists are not ordered. – Peter Horne Jun 7 '10 at 13:54
    
@Mark: I am using v2.6 – Peter Horne Jun 7 '10 at 13:54
    
Seems to be a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2990003/… – Tamás Jun 7 '10 at 13:55
up vote 14 down vote accepted

In Python 2.6 or newer you can use itertools.product:

>>> import itertools
>>> map(''.join, itertools.product(*letters))
apj
apk
apl
aqj
aqk
aql
...etc...
csk
csl
share|improve this answer
    
And in older Pythons, you can copy the pure Python implementation of product from the itertools docs. – Mike Graham Jun 7 '10 at 14:07

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